Mr John Baron Written Questions

38 Questions to Government Departments tabled by Mr John Baron


Date Title Questioner
7 Jan 2021, 10:23 a.m. Members: Coronavirus John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letters of 16 October and 13 and 25 November 2020 from the hon Member for Basildon and Billericay on a constituent with reference JB29486.

Answer (Edward Argar)

We are working to provide all Members and external correspondents with accurate answers to their correspondence, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s letter will be answered as soon as possible.

5 Nov 2020, 1:43 p.m. Insulin John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure adequate supplies of insulin after the transition period.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

Our priority is to ensure that patients continue to have access to the medicines they need, including insulin. We continue to work closely with industry, the National Health Service and others in the supply chain to deliver the shared goal of continuity of safe patient care by mitigating any potential disruption to supply into the United Kingdom of medicines at the end of the transition period.

As set out in a letter from the Department to industry of 3 August, we are implementing a multi-layered approach, that involves asking suppliers of medicines and medical products to the UK from or via the European Union to get trader ready, reroute their supply chains away from any potential disruption and stockpiling to a target level of six weeks on UK soil where this is possible. The letter is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-to-medicines-and-medical-products-suppliers-3-august-2020/letter-to-medicine-suppliers-3-august-2020

6 Oct 2020, 4:31 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of 13 July 2020 and follow-up correspondence of 13 August 2020 and 17 September 20202 regarding a constituent, Mr Philpot.

Answer (Victoria Prentis)

I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon. Member.

A reply will be sent to the hon. Member in due course.

21 Sep 2020, 5:28 p.m. British Council John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will set out the (a) terms of reference and (b) progress of his review of the British Council; and if he will publish a (i) financial recovery plan and (ii) long-term funding settlement for the British Council.

Answer (Nigel Adams)

The internal review of the British Council is ongoing. Officials continue to work closely with the Council to address the impact of Covid-19 on its operations. Further decisions about long-term funding for the Council will be taken at the upcoming Spending Review.

21 Sep 2020, 10:05 a.m. British Council: Coronavirus John Baron

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to provide financial support to the British Council during the covid-19 pandemic.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

HM Treasury has been working closely with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to support the British Council. This includes the provision of a further £26 million of funding in 2019/20, and a loan of £60 million this financial year.

21 Sep 2020, 9:14 a.m. World Food Programme: Coronavirus John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much the Government has donated to the World Food Programme in response to its request for assistance to respond to the covid-19 pandemic, to date.

Answer (James Duddridge)

The UK has committed £15 million to WFP through the UN's COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan to provide essential global humanitarian functions, such as passenger and cargo services, and medical evacuation. We also accelerated payment of a £12 million tranche of our core funding and worked through our country network to accelerate local payments, enabling WFP to rapidly respond to the global pandemic. The UK is one of the WFP's largest donors, providing £544 million in 2019, and as a force for good in the world we are deeply committed to WFP's essential work on famine and food security. I discussed the work of WFP with David Beasley (WFP Executive Director) when we met on 14 September.

3 Sep 2020, 3:52 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Basildon an Billericay of 24 April 2020 and follow up correspondence of 29 May 2020,18 June 2020 and 16 July 2020 regarding constituent Ms Greene.

Answer (Victoria Prentis)

I apologise for the delay in responding to my Hon Friend. A reply to my Hon Friend’s correspondence will be sent out very shortly.

21 Jul 2020, 4:35 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of 16 March 2020, 14 April 2020, 14 May 2020 and 18 June 2020 on the campaign on the number of deaths of horses in horse racing.

Answer (Victoria Prentis)

I apologise for the delay in responding to my Hon Friend. A reply to my Hon Friend’s correspondence has been prepared and will be sent out very shortly.

21 Jul 2020, 4:02 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 12 March, 23 April and 25 June from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay on the Stop the lie of Israel apartheid week campaign.

Answer (Luke Hall)

Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, departments have received a large volume of correspondence in the recent months which has led to delays. The response to the correspondence in question will be shared shortly.

17 Jul 2020, 3:19 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 2 April, 1 May, 28 May and 25 June 2020 from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay on Sunnymede Pre-school.

Answer (Nick Gibb)

A response has been sent to the letters dated 2 April, 1 May, 28 May and 25 June 2020, from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay. A response was sent via email to the hon. Member on 16 July 2020.

16 Jul 2020, 1:18 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the (a) letter referenced Home Office ref MIN/6357/20 from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay of 21 April 2020 which was transferred to his Department by the Home Office on 12 May 2020 and (b) further correspondence dated 18 June 2020 and 25 June 2020.

Answer (Victoria Prentis)

I apologise for the delay in responding to my Hon Friend. Defra is currently dealing with unprecedented volumes of correspondence due to COVID-19. A reply to my Hon Friend’s correspondence is being prepared and will be sent out very shortly.

9 Jul 2020, 4:22 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letters of 8 April 2020, 12 May 2020 and 18 June 2020 from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay on Mr Alan Bates.

Answer (Jesse Norman)

The Treasury has received a huge volume of additional correspondence in recent months and is sorry for the delay in responding to the Honourable Member. Officials will respond as soon as possible.

1 Jul 2020, 5:09 p.m. Passenger Ships: Coronavirus John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that cruise ship companies pass refunds on to their customers in line with timeframes set in regulations.

Answer (Kelly Tolhurst)

The Government recognises the challenges consumers and many businesses are facing regarding refunds for cancelled cruise ship holidays, which are governed by the Package Travel and Linked Travel Arrangements Regulations 2018.

The Department for Transport has held regular discussions with cruise ship companies and is continuing to work closely with the sector and consumer groups to help ensure cruise ship companies deliver on their commitments. The Government’s position is clear – if a customer asks for a refund, that refund needs to be paid.

6 May 2020, 4:41 p.m. Members: Correspondence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to respond to the letter of 16 April 2020 from the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay and others on Basildon Borough Council.

Answer (Simon Clarke)

A response to the letter has been dispatched and a copy emailed to the office of the hon Member.

27 Apr 2020, 2:38 p.m. Small Businesses: Insurance John Baron

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that small business insurers recognise covid-19 as a notifiable disease.

Answer (John Glen)

The Government is in continual dialogue with the insurance sector about its contribution to handling this unprecedented situation.

For those businesses which have an appropriate policy that covers government ordered closure and unspecified notifiable diseases, the Government’s social distancing instructions are sufficient to allow businesses to make a claim against their insurance, provided the other terms and conditions in their policy are met.

The FCA’s rules require insurers to handle claims fairly and promptly; provide reasonable guidance to help a policyholder make a claim, and appropriate information on its progress; not reject a claim unreasonably; and settle claims promptly once settlement terms are agreed. In addition, the FCA has said that, in light of COVID-19, insurers must consider very carefully the needs of their customers and show flexibility in their treatment of them. The Government is working closely with the FCA to ensure that the rules are being upheld during this crisis.

However, most businesses have not purchased insurance that covers losses from COVID-19. Insurance policies differ significantly, so businesses are encouraged to check the terms and conditions of their specific policy and contact their providers.

The Government recognises that businesses who do not have appropriate insurance cover will require support from elsewhere. As such, businesses should explore the full package of support set out by the Chancellor, which includes measures such as business rates holidays, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and wage support.

27 Apr 2020, 9:55 a.m. Local Broadcasting: Publicity John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to purchase more advertising slots on community radio stations.

Answer (John Whittingdale)

The Government is strongly supportive of the community radio sector and recognises the great value that it offers to those communities they serve, in terms of providing quality local news, information and entertainment. We are committed to community radio's long-term sustainability, which is why we are currently holding discussions with the Community Media Association (CMA) on how to support it through Covid-19. We recognise that community radio is a useful conduit for disseminating information to hard to reach groups, however decisions regarding the funding and distributing of advertisements is dealt with by the Cabinet Office. I understand that the Community Media Association is liaising with them and OmniGov, the government’s media planning and buying partner.

12 Feb 2020, 3:50 p.m. Animal Welfare: Standards John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what responsibilities local authorities have to ensure high standards of animal welfare in their area.

Answer (George Eustice)

Local authorities respond to individual cases of animal welfare and can allocate resources based on local priorities. Under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, local authorities in England and Wales have powers to enforce the Animal Welfare Act 2006, which includes powers of entry and seizure in order to inspect allegations of poor animal welfare and cruelty.

Local authorities also have primary responsibility for the enforcement of legislation concerning animal welfare on farm, in transport and at markets. In addition, in England, local authorities have a statutory duty to enforce The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018, which regulate pet selling, dog breeding, dog and cat boarding, riding schools and exhibiting animals. Under the 2018 Regulations, local authorities have powers to issue, refuse and revoke licences for the five regulated activities. Local authorities are also responsible for licensing zoos under the Zoo Licensing Act 1981 and independent racing greyhound tracks under The Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010”.

Anyone concerned about a local authority’s handling of animal welfare cases can raise this in the first instance with the relevant local authority, of if not satisfied with the outcome, can refer the matter to the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman.

6 Feb 2020, 5:22 p.m. Human Papillomavirus: Vaccination John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ask the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation to make an assessment of the potential merits of a catch-up HPV vaccination programme for boys currently older than 12 to 13 years of age.

Answer (Jo Churchill)

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is due to discuss human papillomavirus vaccination at its February 2020 meeting. Usual practice is for draft minutes from JCVI meetings to be available within six weeks of the Committee meeting.

29 Oct 2019, 4:53 p.m. Cancer: Diagnosis John Baron

Question

What steps he is taking to increase the rate of early cancer diagnosis.

Answer (Matt Hancock)

We have committed within the NHS Long Term Plan to have 75% of cancers diagnosed within the first two stages. In September 2019 we announced funding of £200 million for new equipment to drive earlier diagnosis of cancer and improve survival.

11 Feb 2019, 5:30 p.m. Foreign Relations John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, when the Soft Power Strategy will be published.

Answer (Mark Field)

​No decision has been taken on a publication date for the soft power strategy, or whether the strategy will itself be a published document, though we anticipate public communication of initiatives arising from it.

11 Feb 2019, 4:06 p.m. Health Insurance John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to maintain mutual recognition of EU health insurance policies after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Stephen Hammond)

Current reciprocal healthcare arrangements ensure that people from the United Kingdom and European Union countries can receive healthcare in each other's countries under certain conditions.

The UK Government appreciates the importance of retaining existing reciprocal healthcare arrangements with the EU and has been clear in the negotiations that it wants to see the continuation of these arrangements when the UK leaves the EU.

Subject to the Withdrawal Agreement being agreed by Parliament, during the implementation period all reciprocal healthcare rights will continue until December 2020 and there will be no changes to healthcare for pensioners, workers, students, tourists and other visitors, the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) scheme, or planned treatment.

As part of its future relationship with the EU, the Government has been clear that is proposing continued participation in the EHIC scheme and continued cooperation on planned treatment.

In the event the UK leaves the EU without an agreement, the Government is seeking to secure reciprocal arrangements bilaterally with individual member states.

11 Feb 2019, 3:17 p.m. Professions: Qualifications John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, to what extent professional qualifications and registrations will continue to be mutually recognised between the UK and the EU after the UK leaves the EU.

Answer (Richard Harrington)

Under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement, the current arrangements between the UK and the EU on the mutual recognition of professional qualifications will continue to apply during the implementation period.

UK nationals and EU citizens who have obtained - or applied for - a recognition decision before the end of the implementation period will continue to be able to rely on those recognition decisions - or have those applications completed - after the implementation period. These provisions will apply to applications for the European Professional Card and qualifications recognised under the Professional Qualifications Directive for the purpose of establishment but not for the temporary and occasional provision of services, lawyers practising under host State title, approved statutory auditors, and persons engaged in the trade and distribution of toxic products.

After the implementation period, new applications for recognition of UK qualifications in the EU, and vice versa, will be subject to arrangements to be agreed in the negotiations on our future relationship.

22 Oct 2018, 4:35 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of the litigated claims in which the NHS paid damages in the last 12 months were as a result of (a) breach of duty and (b) or causation.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England.

NHS Resolution has provided the following information.

NHS Resolution has advised it does not pay damages unless on the balance of probabilities there is both a breach of duty and causation. NHS Resolution’s last audited period of accounts which is contained in its Annual Report for 2017-18 showed that it had 3,902 cases where damages have been paid on litigated claims settled in the financial year 2017-18.

22 Oct 2018, 4:33 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to improve the quality of assessments of liability by the NHS in advance of the commencement of legal proceedings.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England.

The Department oversees the performance of NHS Resolution in relation to claims management through its sponsorship arrangements which include a Framework Document and quarterly accountability meetings with reporting against a range of Key Performance Indicators. In addition, the National Audit Office has conducted a Value for Money assessment of the costs of clinical negligence, including examining the role and activities of NHS Resolution in detail. No concerns have been raised to NHS Resolution in relation to its decision making through either process.

NHS Resolution has advised that 70% of cases were resolved in 2017/18 without court proceedings of which 39% resulted in no payment of damages. Less than 1% go to trial with most ending in judgment in favour of the NHS. All its cases are thoroughly reviewed and in the great majority of clinical negligence cases, NHS Resolution obtains independent expert evidence before reaching a decision on liability.

22 Oct 2018, 4:33 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of assessments of liability by the NHS in advance of the commencement of legal proceedings in the last three years.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England.

The Department oversees the performance of NHS Resolution in relation to claims management through its sponsorship arrangements which include a Framework Document and quarterly accountability meetings with reporting against a range of Key Performance Indicators. In addition, the National Audit Office has conducted a Value for Money assessment of the costs of clinical negligence, including examining the role and activities of NHS Resolution in detail. No concerns have been raised to NHS Resolution in relation to its decision making through either process.

NHS Resolution has advised that 70% of cases were resolved in 2017/18 without court proceedings of which 39% resulted in no payment of damages. Less than 1% go to trial with most ending in judgment in favour of the NHS. All its cases are thoroughly reviewed and in the great majority of clinical negligence cases, NHS Resolution obtains independent expert evidence before reaching a decision on liability.

15 Oct 2018, 4:40 p.m. Cancer John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the £200 million allocated to the Cancer Transformation Funding, how much funding each Cancer Alliance (a) received in (i) 2017-2018 and (ii) 2018-2019; and (b) how much such funding remains outstanding.

Answer (Steve Brine)

NHS England is allocating £200 million transformation funding in 2017/18 and 2018/19 to support Cancer Alliances to deliver improvements in faster and earlier diagnosis and quality of life for people living with a cancer diagnosis. Over £72 million was released in 2017/18 to support Cancer Alliances to transform cancer services. A further £9 million went to Greater Manchester to support its Cancer Alliance, as part of a devolution agreement.

For 2018/19, the allocation for each Cancer Alliance is as follows:

Cancer Alliance

Total Funding (£)

Northern

6,991,000

West Yorkshire and Harrogate

5,410,000

South Yorkshire

3,445,000

Cheshire and Merseyside

5,552,000

Lancashire and South Cumbria

3,307,000

Humber, Coast and Vale

3,764,000

Greater Manchester

14,500,000

West Midlands

18,103,000

East Midlands

8,842,000

East of England

16,094,000

Thames Valley

5,369,000

Kent and Medway

2,301,000

Surrey and Sussex

3,128,000

SWAG

5,084,000

Peninsula

3,179,000

Wessex

7,282,000

South East London

2,764,000

RM Partners

12,048,000

UCLH Cancer Collaborative

11,130,000

Pan-London

2,832,000

TOTAL

141,125,000

The figures above include both the revenue and capital funding allocated to each Alliance.

15 Oct 2018, 4:40 p.m. Cancer John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Cancer Transformation Fund, when he plans to publish the provisional allocation of the £29.7 million of capital expenditure classified by NHS England as not yet approved.

Answer (Steve Brine)

NHS England is allocating £200 million transformation funding in 2017/18 and 2018/19 to support Cancer Alliances to deliver improvements in faster and earlier diagnosis and quality of life for people living with a cancer diagnosis. Over £72 million was released in 2017/18 to support Cancer Alliances to transform cancer services. A further £9 million went to Greater Manchester to support its Cancer Alliance, as part of a devolution agreement.

For 2018/19, the allocation for each Cancer Alliance is as follows:

Cancer Alliance

Total Funding (£)

Northern

6,991,000

West Yorkshire and Harrogate

5,410,000

South Yorkshire

3,445,000

Cheshire and Merseyside

5,552,000

Lancashire and South Cumbria

3,307,000

Humber, Coast and Vale

3,764,000

Greater Manchester

14,500,000

West Midlands

18,103,000

East Midlands

8,842,000

East of England

16,094,000

Thames Valley

5,369,000

Kent and Medway

2,301,000

Surrey and Sussex

3,128,000

SWAG

5,084,000

Peninsula

3,179,000

Wessex

7,282,000

South East London

2,764,000

RM Partners

12,048,000

UCLH Cancer Collaborative

11,130,000

Pan-London

2,832,000

TOTAL

141,125,000

The figures above include both the revenue and capital funding allocated to each Alliance.

15 Oct 2018, 2:48 p.m. Cancer John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to undertake an assessment of the value for money of cancer transformation funding.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Data on Cancer Alliance delivery is being collected on a quarterly basis. This will enable an assessment to be made of the impact of the investment that the Alliances are making across the country. We will publish a progress report on delivery of the Cancer Taskforce report shortly.

15 Oct 2018, 2:37 p.m. Cancer John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish the performance data for the Cancer Alliances.

Answer (Steve Brine)

Data and information from across the cancer pathway – including screening, diagnosis, treatment and patient experience – is shared with Cancer Alliances by our new Cancer Alliance Data, Evidence and Analysis Service. This is the first time this data has been brought together in this way to enable evidence-based decision-making for service transformation.

The grid of information for Alliances will shortly be available and updated monthly on the Public Health England National Cancer Registration and Analytical Service website.

11 Jun 2018, 3:45 p.m. Navy John Baron

Question

What assessment he has made of the strategic importance of sea power for UK security and prosperity.

Answer (Lord Lancaster of Kimbolton)

As is befitting an island nation, the UK has one of the most capable, skilled and experienced navies in the world. It is of vital strategic importance to UK security and prosperity.

21 May 2018, 2:46 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in how many medical negligence claims against the NHS which were settled in the last five years legal proceedings were issued; and in how many such claims (a) damages payments were made, (b) the issue of proceedings has been required in order to obtain court approval of the settlement and (c) damages payments were not made.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England.

NHS Resolution has provided the following information:

The following table shows the number of litigated clinical claims closed 2012/13 to 2016/17 as at the end of each respective closure year:

Year of Closure

With Damages

Nil Damages

Total

2012/13

2,009

723

2,732

2013/14

2,202

740

2,942

2014/15

2,291

771

3,062

2015/16

2,514

797

3,311

2016/17

3,217

1,017

4,234

It is not possible to say which of these claims required court approval of the settlement, because NHS Resolution does not record this information in a way that can be easily or quickly extracted.

5 Mar 2018, 4:55 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in how many medical negligence claims against the NHS which were settled in 2016-2017 legal proceedings were issued; and in how many such claims damage payments were made.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution manages clinical negligence claims brought against the National Health Service in England on behalf of organisations who are members of its risk pooling schemes, and has provided the following information:

The following table shows the number of settled clinical negligence claims 2016-17:

Where legal proceedings were issued

4,251

Where legal proceedings were issued and damages paid

3,311

Which were taken to trial

83

Which were taken to trial and damages were awarded

43

The number of claims that were taken to trial in 2016-17 has been interpreted as the number of claims where the trial took place in 2016-17. This is different from the number in the table above which were settled in 2016-17 following a trial, since some of those claims may have gone to trial in an earlier year, although broadly the two groups overlap. This data is as follows:

Clinical negligence claims taken to trial in 2016/17

78

Clinical negligence claims taken to trial in 2016/17 where damages were awarded

36

5 Mar 2018, 4:55 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many medical negligence claims against the NHS were taken to trial in 2016-2017; and in how many such trials damages were awarded.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution manages clinical negligence claims brought against the National Health Service in England on behalf of organisations who are members of its risk pooling schemes, and has provided the following information:

The following table shows the number of settled clinical negligence claims 2016-17:

Where legal proceedings were issued

4,251

Where legal proceedings were issued and damages paid

3,311

Which were taken to trial

83

Which were taken to trial and damages were awarded

43

The number of claims that were taken to trial in 2016-17 has been interpreted as the number of claims where the trial took place in 2016-17. This is different from the number in the table above which were settled in 2016-17 following a trial, since some of those claims may have gone to trial in an earlier year, although broadly the two groups overlap. This data is as follows:

Clinical negligence claims taken to trial in 2016/17

78

Clinical negligence claims taken to trial in 2016/17 where damages were awarded

36

30 Jan 2018, 3:09 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average hourly rate paid to lawyers instructed by the NHS in medical negligence claims is.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution is responsible for managing clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service and it contracts with a panel of legal firms. NHS Resolution has supplied the following information on the rates paid under the panel contract.

Rates for instruction received before May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£194

£173

£166

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more Post-Qualified Experience (PQE)

£179

£164

£152

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£162

£148

£145

Solicitors Non-Qualified – 4 years PQE

£155

£144

£140

Legal executives, paralegals or trainee solicitors

£90

£83

£78

Rates for instruction received since May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£200

£179

£172

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more PQE

£185

£170

£157

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£167

£153

£150

Solicitors NQ – 4 years PQE

£160

£149

£145

Legal executives

£99

£92

£86

Paralegals or trainee solicitors

£93

£85

£80

A new panel contract was put in place in May 2017. Pre-May 2017 rates continue to apply where the instruction was received before May 2017 and the case is still active.

NHS Resolution has advised that Panel Lawyers are paid the same rate whether they win a case or not. Fixed/capped fees are applied on a number of cases in litigation to ensure cases are not prolonged.

Performance indicators including time to resolution and legal costs are monitored for all panel firms as part of the contract management arrangements. Defence costs are monitored very carefully on a monthly basis and immediate steps are taken with the relevant firm under the contractual agreement with them to ensure that costs do not escalate.

The Department oversees NHS Resolution’s performance through its sponsorship arrangements. This includes formal accountability reviews between senior departmental officials and the leadership of NHS Resolution.

General practitioners’ and dentists’ indemnity to cover clinical negligence payments is currently provided privately by Medical Defence Organisations. The Department does not have access to this information regarding primary care and dentistry.

30 Jan 2018, 3:09 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether lawyers instructed by the NHS to defend claims of medical negligence are paid the same hourly rate whether or not the claim succeeds, as denoted by court award or agreement to pay damages.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution is responsible for managing clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service and it contracts with a panel of legal firms. NHS Resolution has supplied the following information on the rates paid under the panel contract.

Rates for instruction received before May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£194

£173

£166

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more Post-Qualified Experience (PQE)

£179

£164

£152

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£162

£148

£145

Solicitors Non-Qualified – 4 years PQE

£155

£144

£140

Legal executives, paralegals or trainee solicitors

£90

£83

£78

Rates for instruction received since May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£200

£179

£172

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more PQE

£185

£170

£157

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£167

£153

£150

Solicitors NQ – 4 years PQE

£160

£149

£145

Legal executives

£99

£92

£86

Paralegals or trainee solicitors

£93

£85

£80

A new panel contract was put in place in May 2017. Pre-May 2017 rates continue to apply where the instruction was received before May 2017 and the case is still active.

NHS Resolution has advised that Panel Lawyers are paid the same rate whether they win a case or not. Fixed/capped fees are applied on a number of cases in litigation to ensure cases are not prolonged.

Performance indicators including time to resolution and legal costs are monitored for all panel firms as part of the contract management arrangements. Defence costs are monitored very carefully on a monthly basis and immediate steps are taken with the relevant firm under the contractual agreement with them to ensure that costs do not escalate.

The Department oversees NHS Resolution’s performance through its sponsorship arrangements. This includes formal accountability reviews between senior departmental officials and the leadership of NHS Resolution.

General practitioners’ and dentists’ indemnity to cover clinical negligence payments is currently provided privately by Medical Defence Organisations. The Department does not have access to this information regarding primary care and dentistry.

30 Jan 2018, 3:09 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that lawyers instructed by the NHS to defend claims of medical negligence do not prolong proceedings to increase their fees.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution is responsible for managing clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service and it contracts with a panel of legal firms. NHS Resolution has supplied the following information on the rates paid under the panel contract.

Rates for instruction received before May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£194

£173

£166

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more Post-Qualified Experience (PQE)

£179

£164

£152

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£162

£148

£145

Solicitors Non-Qualified – 4 years PQE

£155

£144

£140

Legal executives, paralegals or trainee solicitors

£90

£83

£78

Rates for instruction received since May 2017

Inner London hourly rate

Outer London hourly rate

Provincial hourly rate

Nominated Partner

£200

£179

£172

Other Partner, and/or solicitor 10 years of more PQE

£185

£170

£157

Solicitors 5 – 9 years PQE

£167

£153

£150

Solicitors NQ – 4 years PQE

£160

£149

£145

Legal executives

£99

£92

£86

Paralegals or trainee solicitors

£93

£85

£80

A new panel contract was put in place in May 2017. Pre-May 2017 rates continue to apply where the instruction was received before May 2017 and the case is still active.

NHS Resolution has advised that Panel Lawyers are paid the same rate whether they win a case or not. Fixed/capped fees are applied on a number of cases in litigation to ensure cases are not prolonged.

Performance indicators including time to resolution and legal costs are monitored for all panel firms as part of the contract management arrangements. Defence costs are monitored very carefully on a monthly basis and immediate steps are taken with the relevant firm under the contractual agreement with them to ensure that costs do not escalate.

The Department oversees NHS Resolution’s performance through its sponsorship arrangements. This includes formal accountability reviews between senior departmental officials and the leadership of NHS Resolution.

General practitioners’ and dentists’ indemnity to cover clinical negligence payments is currently provided privately by Medical Defence Organisations. The Department does not have access to this information regarding primary care and dentistry.

15 Jan 2018, 5:03 p.m. NHS: Negligence John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list the solicitors instructed to defend clinical negligence claims against the NHS where the claim has resolved, and for each such firm (a) what fees were paid, (b) how many claims were made and (c) how many of those were successful as denoted by payment of damages whether by court award or settlement in the last 12 months.

Answer (Steve Barclay)

NHS Resolution manages clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service in England on behalf of member organisations. NHS Resolution has provided the following information:

The data extract is for the last audited financial year 2016/17. The 2017/18 data has not yet been audited.

The table below shows the number of clinical claims closed (or settled as a Periodical Payment) 2016/17 as at 31 March 2017 by panel firm.

Panel Firm

Number of Claims

Number of Successful Claims

Defence Costs Paid

Bevan Brittan LLP Solicitors

1,078

609

12,213,899

BLM Solicitors

109

58

823,468

Browne Jacobson Solicitors

927

520

10,244,176

Capsticks Solicitors

1,123

657

12,279,667

Clyde and Co Solicitors

397

238

4,187,710

DAC Beachcroft LLP Solicitors

2,255

1,357

22,851,953

Hempsons Solicitors

1,309

792

15,747,577

Hill Dickinson Solicitors

885

527

9,172,560

Kennedys Solicitors

964

558

9,403,916

Ward Hadaway Solicitors

366

178

4,247,966

Weightmans Solicitors

900

513

8,620,341

Total

10,313

6,007

109,793,233

Notes:

  1. Defence costs include profit, costs and disbursements such as counsel, expert fees and court fees. It would not be correct to say that these are the sums received by those firms for the services that they alone provide.

  1. The variability in the numbers for the firms is caused by the number of offices the defence firm has on the panel.

15 Nov 2017, 11:48 a.m. Human Papillomavirus: Vaccination John Baron

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will publish (a) an assessment and (b) data supporting the responses to the Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisation's consultation on extending HPV vaccination to boys; and how many and what proportion of submissions reported that vaccination.

Answer (Steve Brine)

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) met on 4 October 2017 and discussed the responses from stakeholders to JCVI’s interim advice on whether to extend the human papilloma virus vaccination to boys. The minutes of 4 October JCVI meeting will be published on 15 November 2017 at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/joint-committee-on-vaccination-and-immunisation#publications-and-statements