Tip: To match a phrase, use quotation marks around the search term. eg. "Parliamentary Estate"

Written Question
Home Care Services
14 Oct 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government's policy is on the role of housing-with-care within the social care system.

Answered by Gillian Keegan

The Government’s plan for health and social care, announced on 7 September, recognised the important role of housing in providing care and support to people in the community. There is clear evidence that the right housing arrangements can deliver improved outcomes and meet people’s preferences to remain in their own home. We will invest in supported housing, including housing-with-care, as well as exploring other innovative housing solutions to support more people to live independently at home for longer, with personalised care and support. We will continue to work closely with the sector, including as part of the white paper on adult social care reform which will be published later this year.


Written Question
Sheltered Housing
24 Sep 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what the Government's policy is on the role of housing-with-care in future housing market provision.

Answered by Christopher Pincher

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 49106 on 22 September.


Written Question
Sheltered Housing
24 Sep 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what steps his Department is taking to promote housing-with-care.

Answered by Christopher Pincher

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to Question UIN 49106 on 22 September.


Written Question
Rail Review
9 Sep 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to implement the policies set out in the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail.

Answered by Chris Heaton-Harris

Transformation of our railways has begun, and passengers are already benefiting, including through the introduction of new flexi season tickets.


Written Question
Sheep Scab: Disease Control
28 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what support the Government is providing to farmers who are struggling to manage the outbreak of sheep scab, or psoroptic mange, on their farms.

Answered by Victoria Prentis

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Endemic diseases like sheep scab affect animal health and welfare, as well as productivity. As set out in the 25 year Environment Plan and the Agricultural Transition Plan: June 2021 progress update, we are working with industry to reduce the impact of endemic diseases, including through the launch in 2022 of an Annual Health and Welfare Review for eligible livestock farmers.

Sheep Scab initiatives are currently managed at a local level but we are working with Devolved Administrations to plan how we tackle the condition across regions.

A group of experts have recently been successful in a bid for funding from Defra via the Rural Development Programme for England to lead a two-year community-led project to improve the control of sheep scab in three hot spot areas where scab currently presents a significant problem: the North West, the Midlands and the South West. Farmers participating in this initiative will receive a unique combination of on-farm advice, best practice training, and free blood testing.

Farmers seeking further advice on sheep scab can contact the Animal Plant Health Agency (APHA).


Written Question
Sheep Scab: Disease Control
28 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what measures the Government is taking to work with devolved nations to tackle the spread of sheep scab across the regions.

Answered by Victoria Prentis

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Endemic diseases like sheep scab affect animal health and welfare, as well as productivity. As set out in the 25 year Environment Plan and the Agricultural Transition Plan: June 2021 progress update, we are working with industry to reduce the impact of endemic diseases, including through the launch in 2022 of an Annual Health and Welfare Review for eligible livestock farmers.

Sheep Scab initiatives are currently managed at a local level but we are working with Devolved Administrations to plan how we tackle the condition across regions.

A group of experts have recently been successful in a bid for funding from Defra via the Rural Development Programme for England to lead a two-year community-led project to improve the control of sheep scab in three hot spot areas where scab currently presents a significant problem: the North West, the Midlands and the South West. Farmers participating in this initiative will receive a unique combination of on-farm advice, best practice training, and free blood testing.

Farmers seeking further advice on sheep scab can contact the Animal Plant Health Agency (APHA).


Written Question
Sheep Scab: Disease Control
28 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what measures the Government is taking to work with key stakeholders to manage the spread of sheep scab, or psoroptic mange, in England.

Answered by Victoria Prentis

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Endemic diseases like sheep scab affect animal health and welfare, as well as productivity. As set out in the 25 year Environment Plan and the Agricultural Transition Plan: June 2021 progress update, we are working with industry to reduce the impact of endemic diseases, including through the launch in 2022 of an Annual Health and Welfare Review for eligible livestock farmers.

Sheep Scab initiatives are currently managed at a local level but we are working with Devolved Administrations to plan how we tackle the condition across regions.

A group of experts have recently been successful in a bid for funding from Defra via the Rural Development Programme for England to lead a two-year community-led project to improve the control of sheep scab in three hot spot areas where scab currently presents a significant problem: the North West, the Midlands and the South West. Farmers participating in this initiative will receive a unique combination of on-farm advice, best practice training, and free blood testing.

Farmers seeking further advice on sheep scab can contact the Animal Plant Health Agency (APHA).


Written Question
Large Goods Vehicle Drivers: EU Countries
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of new cabotage rules set out by the Trade and Cooperation Agreement on UK hauliers involved in touring activities in the EU.

Answered by Rachel Maclean

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) allows EU hauliers to continue to operate to, from, through and within the UK without the need for permits. The TCA ensures that the vast majority of journeys will continue as they did before the end of the transition period.

The Department for Transport continues to have regular discussions with colleagues across Whitehall on this issue, and is working closely with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport through their Touring Working Group. The Department also continues engage directly with the road haulage sector to help them adapt to the new rules under the TCA.


Written Question
Large Goods Vehicles: Arts
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made with the EU on negotiating a cultural exemption on cabotage limits for UK hauliers involved in touring activities in the EU.

Answered by Rachel Maclean

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) allows EU hauliers to continue to operate to, from, through and within the UK without the need for permits. The TCA ensures that the vast majority of journeys will continue as they did before the end of the transition period.

The Department for Transport continues to have regular discussions with colleagues across Whitehall on this issue, and is working closely with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport through their Touring Working Group. The Department also continues engage directly with the road haulage sector to help them adapt to the new rules under the TCA.


Written Question
Motor Vehicles: Arts
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent progress he has made on the publication of guidance for (a) splitter vans and (b) all other vehicles used by artists touring in the EU.

Answered by Rachel Maclean

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) allows EU hauliers to continue to operate to, from, through and within the UK without the need for permits. The TCA ensures that the vast majority of journeys will continue as they did before the end of the transition period.

The Department for Transport continues to have regular discussions with colleagues across Whitehall on this issue, and is working closely with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport through their Touring Working Group. The Department also continues engage directly with the road haulage sector to help them adapt to the new rules under the TCA.


Written Question
Large Goods Vehicle Drivers: EU Countries
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the new cabotage rules set out in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU, what recent assessment he has made of ways to ease new restrictions on cabotage and road haulage for tours operating from the UK.

Answered by Rachel Maclean

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) allows EU hauliers to continue to operate to, from, through and within the UK without the need for permits. The TCA ensures that the vast majority of journeys will continue as they did before the end of the transition period.

The Department for Transport continues to have regular discussions with colleagues across Whitehall on this issue, and is working closely with the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport through their Touring Working Group. The Department also continues engage directly with the road haulage sector to help them adapt to the new rules under the TCA.


Written Question
Events Industry: Trade Agreements
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Government's proposed trade deals with Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein include permit free touring provisions for UK support staff involved in touring activities in the EEA.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

The UK’s creative industries are the finest in the world and this Government understands that the cultural and creative sectors rely on the ability to move people across borders quickly, simply, and with minimal cost and administration.

On 8 July, the UK - Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein Free Trade Agreement was signed.

The agreement allows UK touring artists, entertainers and support staff to travel to and work in Norway and Liechtenstein for 90 days in any 180 day period, and Iceland for 90 days in one calendar year without the need for a work permit.

The deal was based on the same UK offer that the EU turned down in negotiations. This shows our proposals were workable and our door remains open if the EU is willing to reconsider its position.

To provide further clarity on the arrangements, UK and EEA states plan to issue a non-binding clarification of entry routes for performers, artists and their support staff.


Written Question
Arts: EU Countries
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to work with his counterparts in the EU member states that have more restrictive visa and work permit requirements than those of the UK, to ensure that artists from the UK can continue touring on a reciprocal basis.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.


Written Question
Theatre: EU Countries
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer on 25 May to Question 3150 on Theatre: EU Countries, what assessment his Department has made of the varying time limits placed on touring activities without needing visas or work permits offered by the 17 EU Member States.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.


Written Question
Musicians: Visas and Work Permits
22 Jul 2021

Questioner: Giles Watling (CON - Clacton)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent progress he has made on (a) short term visa and (b) work permit requirements for touring artists and support staff since since the publication on the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

Answered by Caroline Dinenage

We have always acknowledged that the end of freedom of movement would have consequences for touring musicians and performers. That is why, as the Secretary of State has said, we have moved at pace and with urgency to provide greater clarity about the current position, including working with our friends in EU Member States, to support the creative sectors tour in Europe with ease.

Member States are principally responsible for deciding the rules governing what work UK visitors can undertake in the EU, and we have spoken to every Member State. We have established musicians and performers do not need visas or work permits for short-term tours in at least 19 out of 27 Member States. This includes France, Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark and many more. The length of tour permitted without a visa or permit varies across Member States. For many Member States it is for up to 90 days, which will capture the vast majority of tours.

We are continuing to speak to all Member States to encourage them to ensure their rules and guidance are clear and accessible. And we are now working closely with those Member States that do require visas or work permits for short-term tours to encourage them to adopt a more flexible approach, in line with the UK’s own rules which allow creative professionals to tour here easily. Formal approaches have been made to those Member States, and DCMS ministers will play an active role in discussions.