Debates between Lord Ravensdale and Baroness Berridge

There have been 1 exchanges between Lord Ravensdale and Baroness Berridge

1 Mon 9th November 2020 Carbon Emissions
Department for Education
3 interactions (290 words)

Carbon Emissions

Debate between Lord Ravensdale and Baroness Berridge
Monday 9th November 2020

(3 months, 3 weeks ago)

Lords Chamber

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Department for Education
Baroness Berridge Portrait Baroness Berridge (Con)
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My Lords, it is part of the overall reforms that the Government have introduced to embed employers—whether in T-levels, apprenticeships, or level 4 and level 5 qualifications—so that we can ensure that these developing industries have the skills they need. For instance, for apprenticeships there is a sustainability advisory board. But the noble Earl is correct, which is why we have also committed to planting 75,000 acres of trees by the end of this Parliament, and at the moment 7,200 people are currently employed in offshore wind farms.

Lord Ravensdale Portrait Lord Ravensdale (CB)
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My Lords, I declare my interests as in the register. A recent survey found that while 77% of offshore oil and gas workers were open to joining the renewables sector, and over half to working in wind power, there were not sufficient routes for them to reskill, and the routes that did exist were not sector-wide. Will the Government make reskilling a priority, and will it form part of the 10-point plan that the Prime Minister is due to announce?

Baroness Berridge Portrait Baroness Berridge (Con)
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The noble Lord will not be surprised that I am not at liberty to reveal anything more than the first point of the 10-point plan that the Prime Minister has outlined, which is in relation to offshore wind. For oil and gas there is a transition sector project because we are aware that those people, particularly people in carbon industries, need to transfer. We are hoping that the development of this industry will lead us to have skilled jobs, in particular in some of our most deprived communities. You have to build the blades for these wind farms close to the sea; we need ports that can then export them, and this is very important to some our most deprived coastal communities.