Tip: To match a phrase, use quotation marks around the search term. eg. "Parliamentary Estate"

Written Question
Asylum: Standards
2 Dec 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the economic impact of offering the right to work to asylum seekers who have spent six months awaiting a decision on their asylum claim.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Asylum seeker right to work is a complex issue, not least given the potential incentive it can provide to make dangerous journeys to the UK or to make ill-founded claims simply to be able to work whilst they are considered

A review of the policy is ongoing.


Written Question
Asylum: Standards
2 Dec 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many asylum seekers have spent at least six months awaiting a decision on their asylum claim in the UK.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The Home Office publishes information on asylum applications and resettlement in the Immigration statistics quarterly release. Data on the number of asylum applications that are currently awaiting an initial decision are published in table Asy_D03 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets (which is attached), which includes whether cases have been waiting less or more than 6 months.

The number of people awaiting an initial decision is a subset of the total number of people in the asylum system (‘asylum work in progress’), which also includes those awaiting appeal outcomes and failed asylum seekers that are subject to removal from the UK. The total number of cases in the asylum system is published in the ‘Immigration and Protection’ data of the Migration Transparency Data collection.


Written Question
Asylum: Taxation
30 Nov 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how much tax revenue has been generated by those granted asylum in the UK for the financial year 2019–20.

Answered by Lord Agnew of Oulton

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) does not hold information on the migration status of individuals paying Income Tax as that detail is not required for the operation of Income Tax.


Written Question
Asylum: Economic Situation
25 Nov 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the net contribution to the economy generated by those granted asylum in the UK over the financial year 2019–20.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The Home Office has not made an assessment of the net contribution to the economy generated by those granted asylum in the UK over the financial year 2019–20.


Written Question
Ectopic Pregnancy
22 Jun 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bethell on 23 April (HL14837) in which he said that the Department of Health and Social Care had made "no assessment" of the ability to screen for ectopic pregnancies via telemedicine abortion services, how they are ensuring that the clinical guidance set by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists is sufficient to prevent ectopic pregnancies from going undiagnosed.

Answered by Lord Bethell

It is the role of clinical experts such as the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to set clinical practice and ensure that it includes appropriate guidance on identification of ectopic pregnancies.


Written Question
Slavery: Victims
25 May 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement in the Home Office press release 'Alarming rise of abuse within modern slavery system', published on 20 March, that “Our generous safeguards for victims are being rampantly abused by child rapists, people who pose a threat to national security and failed asylum seekers with no right to be here”, how many people that took advantage of the modern slavery safeguards in each of the last five years fit the profiles described.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

We are committed to ensuring victims of modern slavery are identified quickly and provided with the support they require to start to rebuild their lives.

In March 2021, the Government published a report on issues raised by people in immigration detention. This provides data on some of the concerns we are seeking to address through the New Plan for Immigration. This is available at: Issues raised by people facing return in immigration detention - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

There are concerns about the potential for a referral to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) to be used to frustrate Immigration Enforcement processes or to gain access to support inappropriately.

For example, there has been a growth in NRM referrals being made after a person enters immigration detention. In 2019, 16% of people detained within the UK following immigration offences were referred as potential victims of modern slavery. This is up from just 3% in 2017.

This raises legitimate concerns that some referrals are being made late in the process to frustrate immigration action and that legitimate referrals are not being made in a timely way. The New Plan for Immigration will address both concerns.


Written Question
Abortion: Telemedicine
23 Apr 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the ability to screen for ectopic pregnancies via telemedicine abortion services.

Answered by Lord Bethell

No assessment has been made. The Department does not set clinical practice. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has issued clinical guidelines Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care: Information for healthcare professionals. A copy is attached. The guidance sets out that taking a history and a symptom-based approach, with an ultrasound if indicated, is consistent with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s guidance on the diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy. The Royal College’s guidance includes a decision aid for clinicians to use to help determine if an ultra-sound scan is required.


Written Question
Abortion: Drugs
16 Mar 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by the Minister of State at the Department of Health and Social Care on 16 February (151601 and 150684), what consideration the Human Tissue Authority gave to the ethics of the home use of abortion pills, approved in March 2020; and what assessment that Authority has made of the impact of at home abortions on (a) sewage and (b) non-recyclable waste systems.

Answered by Lord Bethell

It is not within the Human Tissue Authority’s remit to consider the ethics of the home use of abortion pills or to make any assessment of the impact on sewage and non-recyclable waste systems.


Written Question
Health Services: Hospitals
21 Jan 2021

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any national triage system has been put in place in hospitals for the upcoming winter period; if so, (1) what are the criteria of that system, (2) what guidance they have circulated to hospitals about that system, and (3) whether any such guidance states that all patients should be triaged based on care need rather than age.

Answered by Lord Bethell

The National Health Service has repeatedly instructed staff that no patient who could benefit from treatment should be denied it. Clinicians are focused on assessing the individual needs of patients and providing the care that will benefit them best.


When issuing guidance on restoration of non-COVID-19 health services, NHS England instructed providers to make full use of available capacity whilst protecting the most vulnerable. Furthermore, throughout the pandemic, public health measures have protected our most vulnerable patients. For example, we have ensured care home residents and staff are protected, including testing all residents and staff, ring-fencing £1.1 billion for infection control and making a further £4.6 billion available to councils to address pressures caused by the pandemic.


Written Question
Deaths: Hospitals
2 Dec 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of deaths from (1) dehydration, (2) malnutrition, and (3) bed sores, in (a) care homes, and (b) hospitals, since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Answered by Lord True

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have therefore asked the Authority to respond.

Dear Lady Stroud,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Question regarding what estimate has been made of the number of deaths from (1) dehydration, (2) malnutrition, and (3) bed sores, in (a) care homes, and (b) hospitals, since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic (HL10551).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing the number of deaths registered in England and Wales. The most recent set of final figures published are for deaths registered in 2019[1]. The final information on deaths registered in 2020 will be released in summer 2021.

As part of our provisional analysis for 2020 so far, we released an article, Analysis of death registrations not involving coronavirus (COVID-19), England and Wales: 28 December 2019 to 10 July 2020[2]. Table 1 shows the number of deaths in each week and the corresponding 5-year average for disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration), malnutrition and nutritional anaemias. Information on bed sores, and breakdowns by care homes and hospitals, is not available.

Cause of death is defined using the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition (ICD-10).

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Table 1: Weekly provisional figures on Non-COVID-19 deaths due to disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration), malnutrition and nutritional anaemias. England and Wales, weeks 1 to 28 combined[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

ICD-10 codes

Cause of death groups

Age group

Deaths

2020

E86–E87

Disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration)

173

E86–E87

Disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration)

65+

172

5-year average

E86–E87

Disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration)

103.4

E86–E87

Disorders of fluid electrolyte and acid-based balance (dehydration)

65+

128.8

2020

D50–D53, E40–E64

Malnutrition and nutritional anaemias

29

D50–D53, E40–E64

Malnutrition and nutritional anaemias

65+

75

5-year average

D50–D53, E40–E64

Malnutrition and nutritional anaemias

20.8

D50–D53, E40–E64

Malnutrition and nutritional anaemias

65+

66

Source: ONS

[1]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsregisteredinenglandandwalesseriesdrreferencetables

[2]https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/analysisofdeathregistrationsnotinvolvingcoronaviruscovid19englandandwales28december2019to1may2020/28december2019to10july2020

[3] A non-COVID-19 death is a death where COVID-19 is not mentioned on the death certificate. The ICD 1 definitions for COVID-19 are UO7.1 and UO7.2.

[4] ‘Due to’ refers to when the condition was the underlying cause. An ‘underlying cause of death’ refers to the main cause of death.

[5] For deaths registered from 1 January 2020, cause of death is coded to the ICD-10 classification using MUSE 5.5 software. Previous years were coded to IRIS 4.2.3. Further information about the change in software is available on the ONS website: https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/causeofdeathcodinginmortalitystatisticssoftwarechangesjanuary2019

[6] These figures represent death registrations. There can be a delay between the date a death occurred and the date a death was registered. More information can be found in our ‘Impact of registration delays’ release: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/impactofregistrationdelaysonmortalitystatisticsinenglandandwales/2018

[7] All figures for 2020 are provisional.

[8] Figures include deaths of non-residents.

[9] Caution should be used when analysing conditions with low numbers of deaths as these can have high levels of year on year variation relative to the number of deaths.


Written Question
Intensive Care: Older People
1 Dec 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that a triage tool has been used to deny elderly patients access to intensive care during the COVID-19 pandemic; and what guidance, if any, they circulated to hospitals about the use of any such tool.

Answered by Lord Bethell

Claims that frail and elderly patients were denied care in wave one of the coronavirus pandemic, in part because of a triage tool which was developed for use if the National Health Service was overwhelmed, are categorically untrue. Guidance to help clinicians make rational, evidence-based decisions in the event of intensive care units being overwhelmed was commissioned by NHS England’s National Medical Director and the four United Kingdom Chief Medical Officers but work was halted when it became clear the NHS would not be overwhelmed.


Written Question
Pregnancy: Screening
28 Oct 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential impact of the national rollout of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing on the prevalence of sex-selective abortion; and what plans they have to suspend the rollout of that scheme until they have carried out a review of that potential impact.

Answered by Lord Bethell

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee’s (UK NSC) recommendation on the use of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), is as a contingent test in the National Health Service Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme for Down’s syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and Patau’s syndrome only.

NIPT has not been recommended for the use of any other genetic marker, including sex.

There are no plans to suspend the rollout of the NIPT screening programme. NIPT will be introduced as an ‘evaluative roll out’. This means the programme will be able to monitor how the introduction of NIPT is working at each stage of the roll out and make any changes to the pathway and screening processes quickly and effectively. The UK NSC will be kept informed about progress with the evaluation.


Written Question
India: Abortion
28 Sep 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the research by Fengqing Chao et al Probabilistic projection of the sex ratio at birth and missing female births by State and Union Territory in India, published on 19 August, what representations they have made to the government of India about preventing sex-selective abortion.

Answered by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon

We have not made any representations to the Government of India about this.

The UK strongly opposes sex-selective abortion. The UK supports partner governments' efforts to prevent this discrimination through our programmes to promote gender equality, girls' and women's empowerment and rights. In India, the British High Commission in New Delhi and our network of Deputy High Commissions work closely with civil society and non-governmental organisations that are directly promoting women's awareness of their rights. We also continue to promote empowerment through events and campaigns such as "International Women's Day", the "International Day of the Girl Child" and the "Kick like a Girl" project which trained adolescent girls on leadership skills.


Written Question
Somalia: Female Genital Mutilation and Marriage
22 Sep 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their strategy to address (1) female genital mutilation, and (2) child marriage, in Somalia, following the introduction of the Sexual Intercourse Related Crimes Bill in the Parliament of Somalia; and what protections they have established for the protection of British-Somali citizens from (1) female genital mutilation, and (2) child marriage.

Answered by Baroness Sugg

The UK strategy towards Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and early, child and forced marriage in Somalia is incredibly important. We continue our efforts towards ending FGM in all its forms and tackling early, child and forced marriage. The UK Government is lobbying the Government of Somalia to table a bill which is compatible with Somalia's obligations under international law and commitments on the protection of children and women. In 2019 we helped over 24,000 community members participate in conversations to end FGM and child marriage; engaged over 2,000 religious leaders in protecting and promoting human rights for women and girls; and supported the development of plans by over 40 communities to foster more dialogue and action on these issues.

In 2018 the Somali cabinet drafted a Sexual Offence Bill (SOB) which could be instrumental in securing basic sexual and reproductive rights for women. This SOB has not been tabled since its creation, partly due to resistance from clerics and several members of the parliament who find the SOB to not be sufficiently sharia compliant. On 8 August 2020, a modified and regressive version of the SOB, which would for example legalise child marriage, was tabled by parliament. The bill is contentious and civil society, and other development partners are working to stop it from being passed by parliament. BE Mogadishu raises the issue regularly with Parliamentarians at all levels, and supports civil society contacts to do the same.

The UK is equally committed to protecting British-Somali citizens who may be at risk of FGM or forced marriage. The UK Government has a dedicated Forced Marriage Unit leading efforts to combat forced marriage and FGM both at home and abroad and has already provided support to dozens of potential victims in Somalia last year. This support includes UK funded safe-houses in Somalia, including Somaliland, that provide British Nationals with temporary shelter and support, while the consular team establish a plan to repatriate them. Additional support is then available for victims who have returned to the UK.


Written Question
Somalia: Sexual Offences
22 Sep 2020

Questioner: Baroness Stroud (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken, if any, to dissuade the government of Somalia from pursuing the Sexual Intercourse Related Crimes Bill.

Answered by Baroness Sugg

The UK continues to lobby Somalia's parliament, through private conversations as well as public statements to dismiss the 'Sexual Intercourse' bill tabled by some MPs in favour of one that is compatible with Somalia's obligations under international law and commitments on the protection of children and women. The UK is also working to coordinate advocacy efforts with international partners to ensure all messaging is aligned. The UK is encouraged by Somalis lobbying their Parliament and the Somali '#killthebill' social media campaign and continues to support civil society representatives to ensure that Somali voices are heard on human rights issues.