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Written Question
Low Traffic Neighbourhoods
Wednesday 25th October 2023

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government, further to the review of low traffic neighbourhoods announced on 30 July, what steps they plan to take to prevent the introduction of new low traffic neighbourhoods until the review is completed.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

The Government’s review of low-traffic neighbourhood (LTN) schemes is underway. The Department recommends that local authorities should not be introducing any new LTNs, unless already contractually committed, until after the review has concluded.

Installation of LTNs and other traffic management measures remain the responsibility of local councils, who are accountable for the decisions they take.


Written Question
Road Traffic Control: Urban Areas
Wednesday 21st December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of local authorities introducing traffic filters to reduce nitrogen dioxide pollution; and of whether this displaces such pollution from city centres to city peripheries; and what plans they have, if any, to amend the regulations relating to the use of traffic filters in such circumstances.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

Under the NO2 Programme, local authorities with persistent exceedances of nitrogen dioxide concentrations are required to assess and implement measures to reduce and maintain nitrogen dioxide levels to within legal limits in the shortest possible time. Local authorities make their assessment using rigorous transport and air quality modelling. This is informed by impact assessments, which include the consideration of traffic displacement, and extensive public consultation. Measures may include implementation of a Clean Air Zone by a local authority using powers under the Transport Act 2000. Clean Air Zones reduce the frequency of journeys taken by the most-polluting vehicles within the zone and can increase vehicle turnover to cleaner vehicles.

Local authorities monitor NO2 reduction measures throughout their lifetime in collaboration with the DfT/ Defra Joint Air Quality Unit.


Written Question
Road Traffic Control
Tuesday 20th December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) necessity, and (2) sufficiency, of consultation of the public at the conclusion of a period of experimental traffic orders made under section 9 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

No assessment has been made by the Department. However, LTN and traffic filter restrictions require traffic regulation orders (TROs), that must be made following the procedures set out in the Local Authorities' Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996. These already include a requirement for ongoing consultation and evaluation for six-months following the making of an experimental TRO.

If an authority wishes to make an experimental TRO permanent, there are additional consultation requirements as part of the process for making a permanent traffic order under section 1 of the 1984 Act.


Written Question
Road Traffic Control: Urban Areas
Tuesday 20th December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on (1) businesses, and (2) cultural activities, as a result of the installation of city traffic filters.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

Local authorities are responsible for managing their road networks, including decisions on introducing traffic management measures such as traffic filters.

It is for them to consider the possible impacts on communities as part of scheme developments, both positive and negative, and potential mitigations.


Written Question
Road Traffic Control
Tuesday 20th December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what guidance they have given to local authorities which are considering traffic restriction schemes of the changes in traffic patterns resulting from (1) the COVID-19 lockdowns, and (2) increased working from home.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

It is for local authorities to gather relevant data as part of the development of traffic management schemes, which may include local traffic count and travel demand data.

The Department has published the Active Travel Toolkit which provides advice to local authorities on developing walking and cycling schemes, including advice on travel demand management plans. The Department has also published additional Network Management Duty guidance for local authorities on managing their road networks to provide measures to support active travel. Both are available free on the Department’s website.


Written Question
Road Traffic Control
Tuesday 20th December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what consideration they have given to introducing a right for local businesses to require a public inquiry in relation to traffic restrictions imposed under the Local Authorities' Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

LTN and traffic filter restrictions require traffic regulation orders (TROs), which must be made following the procedures set out in the Local Authorities' Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996. These already include a requirement for ongoing consultation and evaluation for 6-months following the making of an experimental TRO. If an authority wishes to make an experimental TRO permanent, there are additional consultation requirements as part of the process for making a permanent traffic order under section 1 of the 1984 Act.

The regulations also require a public inquiry to be held into objections to proposed permanent orders in certain circumstances. The Department has no plans to amend legislation with respect to public inquiries.


Written Question
Low Traffic Neighbourhoods
Tuesday 20th December 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Local Authorities' Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996 in regards to providing sufficiently for (1) consultation of the public before the implementation of low traffic neighbourhood schemes, and (2) post-implementation consultation.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

No such assessment has been made by the Department. Low traffic neighbourhood schemes may be implemented using standard traffic restrictions, which require a Traffic Regulation Order made following the Traffic Orders (Procedure) (England and Wales) Regulations 1996. These already include a requirement for ongoing consultation and evaluation for 6-months following the making of an experimental TRO. For permanent TROs, the regulations require consultation on proposed orders, including with a range of statutory consultees.

The Department recommends as good practice that authorities carry out post implementation reviews for all permanent traffic orders.


Written Question
Taxis: Diability
Friday 8th July 2022

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Stedman-Scott on 21 June (HL Deb col 53GC), when they will publish guidance for taxis and private hire vehicles regarding a more inclusive and accessible service; and when they will introduce legislation to make disability awareness training compulsory for taxi and private hire vehicle drivers.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

On 28 March, the Department published a consultation on updated best practice guidance for local licensing authorities, which advises that every driver should complete disability awareness training. The consultation has now closed, and officials are carefully considering the responses received in order to finalise and publish the substantive guidance document.

The Department remains committed to introducing mandatory disability awareness training for taxi and PHV drivers through new National Minimum Standards for licensing authorities when Parliamentary time allows.


Written Question
Roads: Construction
Thursday 20th June 2019

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask Her Majesty's Government when a Strategic Environmental Assessment will be undertaken in relation to the choice of a preferred corridor of land for the construction of the planned Oxford to Cambridge expressway.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

The preferred route for the Oxford to Cambridge expressway, anticipated to be announced in autumn 2020, will be subject to an Environmental Impact Assessment. A Strategic Environmental Assessment will not be required.


Written Question
Roads: Construction
Thursday 20th June 2019

Asked by: Baroness Deech (Crossbench - Life peer)

Question to the Department for Transport:

To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect of the one million extra homes planned for the Oxford to Cambridge Arc on traffic in that area; and whether they will recalculate any estimates of faster journey time that would result from the Oxford to Cambridge expressway as a result of any such increased traffic.

Answered by Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)

The Expressway traffic model estimates the predicted traffic demand and volume up to 2045. It takes into account planned development based on planning applications and permissions, and allocated development in Local Plans. Traffic speeds and journey times are calculated accordingly. The impact of any new housing developments in the Oxford-Cambridge Arc on the transport network will be considered as part of the appropriate planning process.