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Written Question
Fraud: Criminal Investigation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Charlotte Nichols (LAB - Warrington North)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of reports of fraud have been passed on to police forces from Action Fraud for further investigation in the most recent period for which figures are available.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

The Home Office publish the number of fraud offences recorded by the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) following reports from Action Fraud, Cifas and UK Finance and the number referred to police forces for investigation each year. The latest published figures can be found in Table 4.1 in the link below.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/901030/crime-outcomes-1920-hosb1720-tables.ods


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Green of Deddington (CB - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many of the 2.2 million EU citizens now granted pre-settled status will be able to switch to settled status in (1) 2021, and (2) each of the next five calendar years.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

A person granted pre-settled status can apply for settled status as soon as they qualify for this. They will be eligible for settled status once they have completed five years’ continuous residence or where other criteria for eligibility for settled status without that length of continuous residence are met.

The Home Office cannot assess a person’s eligibility for settled status until they make an application to the scheme.


Written Question
Nitrous Oxide: Crime
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Paul Blomfield (LAB - Sheffield Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to make the (a) possession and (b) recreational use of nitrous oxide an offence.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

No assessment has been made of the merits of making possession or use of nitrous oxide an offence. The Government takes seriously the harms relating to psychoactive substances such as nitrous oxide and it will continue to keep this issue under review and to consider any new or emerging evidence.

The supply of substances for their psychoactive effect is an offence. There are legitimate uses for nitrous oxide, such as in medicine, dentistry and as a propellant for whipped cream canisters, but those who supply nitrous oxide who know, or who are reckless as to whether, it will be used for its psychoactive effect may be subject to a maximum sentence of seven years’ imprisonment, an unlimited fine, or both under the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016.


Written Question
Sexual Offences
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Chi Onwurah (LAB - Newcastle upon Tyne Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 26 March 2021 to Question 169852, on Sexual Offences, whether she has made an assessment of whether there has been an increase in sexually explicit email spam during the covid-19 outbreak.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) monitor the number of reports made each month through their online reporting form, which includes those for spam containing adult content. They are currently undertaking analysis to identify the number of valid complaints which specifically relate to adult content, which the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will write to you provide.


Written Question
Immigration: EU Nationals
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Peter Grant (SNP - Glenrothes)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the level of need to provide physical documentation to prove someone has Settled Status, particularly for people who do not have access to IT equipment or their digital documents.

Answered by Kevin Foster

As part of the development of the EU Settlement Scheme, including the policy to provide those granted status with online evidence of immigration status instead of a physical document, consideration was given to the impact on those who may have limited digital skills or access to IT equipment. The Policy Equality Statement for the scheme can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-settlement-scheme-policy-equality-statement/policy-equality-statement-eu-settlement-scheme

Since the launch of the scheme, we have continued to assess the needs of users, and take steps to ensure those who may be less able to interact digitally are not disadvantaged. This has included making information about an individual’s immigration status available automatically through system to system checks, at the point at which they seek to access the public services. Such checking services are already live for HM Revenue & Customs, the Department for Work and Pensions and NHS England, and will reduce the occasions on which an individual has to use the online service to prove their status. We would be pleased to work with NHS Scotland to implement a similar checking service there relating to services which are the devolved responsibility of the Scottish Government if they wish to do so.

The UK Government has also put in place additional support services, to help those who require assistance to use the online immigration status service. We have a dedicated phone helpline (the Settlement Resolution Centre) where call operators can support users through the online journey, help them to access or recover their online account, help them to update their personal details and where necessary, share status on their behalf if they are unable to do so themselves. The Settlement Resolution Centre will also be able to assist those who are experiencing technical issues with their online immigration status, and if necessary, enable an individual’s status to be verified through alternative means.


Written Question
Windrush Generation: Compensation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to her Answer of 15 April 2021 to Question 179171, on Windrush Generation: Compensation, if she will estimate the number of applications to the Windrush Compensation Scheme that remain outstanding more than (a) two years, (b) 18 months and (c) 12 months after the applicants first submitted those applications.

Answered by Priti Patel

The number of cases being worked through the Windrush Compensation Scheme as of 21 April are 1417. Of these 1417 cases:

  • 281 have been in the process for 12-18 months;
  • 214 have been in the process for over 18 months;
  • 5 have been in the process for over 24 months.

Windrush Compensation Scheme staff continue to work hard to resolve these claims from the moment they are received and individuals are provided with an update on the progress of their claim on a monthly basis as a minimum, unless they have requested otherwise. A case is finally closed when an individual accepts a final offer or an application to the Scheme is unsuccessful as it does not meet the criteria. All claims will have been considered for a preliminary payment of £10,000 within 6 weeks of eligibility being confirmed under the terms of the Scheme, including these open applications. A preliminary payment is offered as soon as we receive the minimum level of information required to show that they will be entitled to compensation under the Scheme. Some of these people may also have received an urgent and exceptional payment. This policy remains available for those who have an urgent and exceptional need that cannot wait for a payment to be made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme. As of 25 March 2021, the Scheme had offered 362 preliminary awards (totalling £3,620,000); of which 255 (£2,550,000) had been accepted. 228 awards (£2,280,000) had been paid.

That said, each person’s claim is deeply personal and requires careful and detailed consideration to understand their individual circumstances and experiences. There are 13 different categories of claim and some individuals’ experiences are more complex than others and it is right we take the time to ensure these are considered carefully. We want people to receive the maximum compensation to which they are entitled and work closely with individuals, for example by contacting other government departments and third parties to help gather evidence to support their claim.

This holistic approach necessarily takes time but is ultimately beneficial to individuals.

Data on the number of claims received and the number of payments made is published as part of the regular transparency data release which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/windrush-compensation-scheme-data-march-2021.

Since April 2019 the Scheme has paid or offered £18 million. Of this, more than £6.1 million have been accepted and paid, an increase of £2 million in one month.

We have made fundamental improvements to the Scheme to ensure people receive significantly more money, more quickly. We increased the value of awards for impact on life at every level so everyone will be paid more in this category, with the maximum award increasing from £10,000 to £100,000 (with options for even higher awards in exceptional circumstances).

Within six weeks of these changes, we had offered more than we had in the first 19 months of the scheme (at the end of January we had offered £12m) and since the end of December we have more than doubled the amount of compensation paid to individuals (from £2.8m to £6.1m).

In December 2018, the Home Office established an Urgent and Exceptional Payments process for those members of the Windrush generation who had an urgent and exceptional need in advance of the Windrush Compensation Scheme. The process remains open for those who need it. The total value of the payments approved as of 29 March 2021 is £104,338.58.


Written Question
Windrush Generation: Compensation
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Stuart C McDonald (SNP - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 15 April 2021 to Question 179170 on Windrush Generation: Compensation, notwithstanding that her Department does not routinely publish the information requested, how many applicants to the Windrush Compensation Scheme her Department is aware of who have died in the period between applying for and receiving compensation under that scheme.

Answered by Priti Patel

It is very regrettable that a claimant passes away before a compensation award can be made or an apology sent to them.

The Windrush Compensation Scheme staff are working hard to ensure that where they are aware of claimants with critical or life shortening illnesses, that their cases are prioritised.

In the deeply unfortunate circumstances where a claimant has passed away after submitting a compensation claim, but before the claim is fully resolved, the team continues to work closely with the appointed representative, usually members of the family, to ensure the compensation payment is made as quickly as possible to that family member.

Out of the 1,996 applications made to the Windrush Compensation Scheme, we are aware of 21 cases to date where unfortunately the claimant has passed away after having submitted a claim but before receiving compensation. We are working closely with the families and legal representatives to determine the right person to whom the compensation can be paid as quickly as possible.

It must be noted that this data is manually recorded and is reliant on the person receiving the information on an applicant notifying the Windrush Compensation Scheme to record this information. The data isn’t recorded in a reportable field in the casework system.


Written Question
Extradition
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Browne of Belmont (DUP - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people have been extradited from the UK in each year since 2018.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The following represents the number of people extradited from the UK under Part 2 of the Extradition Act 2003:

YEAR

NUMBER

2018

16

2019

26

2020

21

2021 (APRIL)

5

TOTAL

68

All figures are from local management information and have not been quality assured to the level of published National Statistics. As such they should be treated as provisional and therefore subject to change. The figures do not include Scotland, which deals with its own extradition cases.

Extraditions from the UK under Part 1 of the Extradition Act 2003 are handled by the National Crime Agency and statistics are published on their website:

https://nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/what-we-do/how-we-work/providing-specialist-capabilities-for-law-enforcement/fugitives-and-international-crime/european-arrest-warrants


Written Question
Migrant Workers: Domestic Service
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Bishop of Bristol (Bishops - Bishops)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government how many bids were received from organisations to provide information sessions on employment rights for overseas domestic workers; whether any of the bids have been successful; and when they expect the sessions to begin.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

Following extensive market engagement, a full commercial tender exercise was conducted, which attracted only two bids to provide the information and advice sessions for Overseas Domestic Workers. Neither bid was successful.

All domestic workers are though provided with an information leaflet explaining their rights and how to access help should they need it. Further help and information is also available online at:

http://www.gov.uk/domestic-workers-in-a-private-household-visa/your-employment-rights


Written Question
Carers: Migrant Workers
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Caroline Lucas (GRN - Brighton, Pavilion)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to expand the list of professions eligible for the fee-free one-year visa extension during the covid-19 outbreak to include care workers; what recent discussions she has had with representatives of care workers on the exclusion of that workforce from that list; what estimate she has made of the number of care workers so affected; and if she will make a statement.

Answered by Kevin Foster

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.


Written Question
Terrorism: Coronavirus
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: John Hayes (CON - South Holland and The Deepings)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the capabilities of terrorist organisations.

Answered by Kevin Foster

We continue to monitor the potential emergence of new security vulnerabilities as a result of the changed COVID-19 landscape. It would not be appropriate to comment further on operational matters which relate to counter terrorism work.


Written Question
Sergei Skripal and Yulia Skripal
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Lord Robathan (CON - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have classified the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal on 4 March 2018 as a terrorist attack.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Dissolution. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.


Written Question
Proscribed Organisations
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Imran Ahmad Khan (CON - Wakefield)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to proscribe extremist groups in the UK.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Terrorism Act 2000 enables a group to be proscribed if it is concerned in terrorism. This means an organisation can be proscribed if it commits or participates in acts of terrorism, prepares for terrorism, promotes or encourages terrorism (including the unlawful glorification of terrorism) or is otherwise concerned in terrorism. In addition, proscription must be a proportionate action to take. The Government continually keeps the list of proscribed organisations under review.

There is no separate regime for banning extremist groups unless they are also concerned in terrorism and satisfy the relevant criteria for proscription.

The Government keeps measures to protect our national security under constant review.


Written Question
British Nationality: Children
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Chris Law (SNP - Dundee West)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2021 to Question 185914 on British Nationality: Children, by what date she plans to have completed her review into fees for immigration and nationality applications in response to the recent Court of Appeal's ruling on citizenship application fees for children.

Answered by Kevin Foster

The Home Office has acknowledged the Court of Appeal’s judgment and has committed to reviewing the child citizenship registration fee in line with its duties under Section 55.

This review is on-going and the results will be published in due course


Written Question
Extradition: India
29 Apr 2021

Questioner: Taiwo Owatemi (LAB - Coventry North West)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people accused of murder have been successfully extradited to India since the signing of the UK-India Extradition Treaty in 1992.

Answered by Kevin Foster

From the available information, there has been one extradition to India for an individual accused of murder during this timeframe. There have been three extraditions from India to the UK for the same offence during this period.