Tip: To match a phrase, use quotation marks around the search term. eg. "Parliamentary Estate"


View sample alert
Written Question
Social Media: Disclosure of Information
6 Jan 2022

Questioner: Damian Collins (CON - Folkestone and Hythe)

Question

To ask the Attorney General, what recent assessment she has made of the CPS’s ability to request and receive data from social media platforms in (a) general and (b) cases involving a deceased child.

Answered by Alex Chalk

Requesting data from social media platforms for use in criminal investigations – which may of course lead to the CPS bringing charges – is an investigative matter for the police, who will have to decide if that’s an appropriate line of inquiry.

Where investigators are unable to obtain data held overseas themselves, CPS prosecutors may draft and issue requests for Mutual Legal Assistance from international counterparts. That capability is further enhanced by powers created by the Government in the Crime (Overseas Production Order) Act 2019.


Written Question
Police: Social Media
25 Nov 2021

Questioner: Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (LAB - Slough)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers are currently under investigation for (a) being in the possession of or (b) sharing grossly offensive material in (a) Slough, (b) each region of the South East, (c) each borough of London and (d) each region of the UK.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Information on the number of police officers under investigation for being in the possession of or sharing grossly offensive material is not collected centrally by the Home Office.


Written Question
Alcoholic drinks: Drugs
15 Nov 2021

Questioner: Lord Taylor of Warwick (Non-affiliated - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to tackle drink spiking.

Answered by Baroness Williams of Trafford

The reports of the spiking of drinks with illegal substances, and of other attacks on individuals in night time venues, are of course concerning. This is an ongoing matter which the police are investigating. We would encourage anyone who is a victim or a witness of the offences to report the information to the police.

The Government is supporting the rollout of pilot initiatives to improve the safety of women in public spaces at night, including in the night-time economy. We have committed to delivering a £5 million ‘Safety of Women at Night’ fund, in addition to the £25 million Safer Streets Fund Round 3. These funds will support projects that target potential perpetrators, seek to protect potential victims, or deliver programmes intended to address offending behaviour. This includes, but is not limited to, policing interventions such as enforcement activity.

Licensing authorities have a number of options available to them to manage the night-time economy through a range of powers to tackle existing individual premises which are causing problems including the use of conditions, licence reviews and closure powers under the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

The SIA is running a long-term public safety campaign targeted at the private security industry on this issue. The SIA has sent out a direct communication to all front-line licence holders (over 300,000) reminding them of the vital role they can play in preventing violence against women and girls. This includes identifying and preventing predatory behaviour. The note also reminds them of their training and duty of care required of them, and guidance on how to help and support individuals in vulnerable situations. The SIA will be running a social media campaign that reinforces these messages and signposts licence holders to best practice and guidance. We know this communication is getting traction from the industry feedback the SIA have been getting; they have also received early feedback from training providers who are looking at how they can support the campaign in their training.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
3 Nov 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to help prevent (a) county lines and (b) other drug dealing operations to liaise online.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why we are investing a dedicated £40m this year to tackle drugs supply and county lines and surge our activity against these ruthless gangs bringing our total dedicated investment to over £65m since November 2019.

Tackling drugs supply and county lines is a key priority for police and law enforcement agencies who receive core funding to respond to a range of serious and organised crime threats, including drugs supply. In total, the Home Office budget for 21/22 is £14.2bn, which includes funding for policing and fire, securing the borders and controlling immigration and issuing passports and visas.

The £40m investment provided this financial year has allowed us to expand and build upon our successful County Lines Programme which, since launching in November 2019, has already seen more than 1,500 lines closed, over 7,400 arrests, £4.3 million in cash and significant quantities of drugs seized, and more than 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded.

Our programme investment includes funding the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre to improve the intelligence picture and co-ordinate the national law enforcement response. We have also increased disruption on the rail networks through the British Transport Police’s dedicated County Lines Taskforce and directly fund police intensification in the top three exporting areas (the Metropolitan Police Service, Merseyside Police, and West Midlands Police). In addition, this year we have established a dedicated fund to help local police forces tackle the scourge of county lines. We are also funding specialist support for young people at risk of county lines exploitation and their families.

Lastly, we are funding the MPS-led Social Media Hub which brings together a dedicated team of police officers and staff who work with Social Media platforms to tackle gang related serious violence perpetrated online, including county lines activity.

County lines drug dealing is a domestic issue, so our engagement with international partners on this is limited. However, we engage with the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime and other international partners on a range of drug policy issues.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
3 Nov 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with international partners on tackling county lines drugs gangs.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why we are investing a dedicated £40m this year to tackle drugs supply and county lines and surge our activity against these ruthless gangs bringing our total dedicated investment to over £65m since November 2019.

Tackling drugs supply and county lines is a key priority for police and law enforcement agencies who receive core funding to respond to a range of serious and organised crime threats, including drugs supply. In total, the Home Office budget for 21/22 is £14.2bn, which includes funding for policing and fire, securing the borders and controlling immigration and issuing passports and visas.

The £40m investment provided this financial year has allowed us to expand and build upon our successful County Lines Programme which, since launching in November 2019, has already seen more than 1,500 lines closed, over 7,400 arrests, £4.3 million in cash and significant quantities of drugs seized, and more than 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded.

Our programme investment includes funding the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre to improve the intelligence picture and co-ordinate the national law enforcement response. We have also increased disruption on the rail networks through the British Transport Police’s dedicated County Lines Taskforce and directly fund police intensification in the top three exporting areas (the Metropolitan Police Service, Merseyside Police, and West Midlands Police). In addition, this year we have established a dedicated fund to help local police forces tackle the scourge of county lines. We are also funding specialist support for young people at risk of county lines exploitation and their families.

Lastly, we are funding the MPS-led Social Media Hub which brings together a dedicated team of police officers and staff who work with Social Media platforms to tackle gang related serious violence perpetrated online, including county lines activity.

County lines drug dealing is a domestic issue, so our engagement with international partners on this is limited. However, we engage with the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime and other international partners on a range of drug policy issues.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
3 Nov 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much and what proportion of her Department's budget is allocated to tackling county lines drugs gangs.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why we are investing a dedicated £40m this year to tackle drugs supply and county lines and surge our activity against these ruthless gangs bringing our total dedicated investment to over £65m since November 2019.

Tackling drugs supply and county lines is a key priority for police and law enforcement agencies who receive core funding to respond to a range of serious and organised crime threats, including drugs supply. In total, the Home Office budget for 21/22 is £14.2bn, which includes funding for policing and fire, securing the borders and controlling immigration and issuing passports and visas.

The £40m investment provided this financial year has allowed us to expand and build upon our successful County Lines Programme which, since launching in November 2019, has already seen more than 1,500 lines closed, over 7,400 arrests, £4.3 million in cash and significant quantities of drugs seized, and more than 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded.

Our programme investment includes funding the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre to improve the intelligence picture and co-ordinate the national law enforcement response. We have also increased disruption on the rail networks through the British Transport Police’s dedicated County Lines Taskforce and directly fund police intensification in the top three exporting areas (the Metropolitan Police Service, Merseyside Police, and West Midlands Police). In addition, this year we have established a dedicated fund to help local police forces tackle the scourge of county lines. We are also funding specialist support for young people at risk of county lines exploitation and their families.

Lastly, we are funding the MPS-led Social Media Hub which brings together a dedicated team of police officers and staff who work with Social Media platforms to tackle gang related serious violence perpetrated online, including county lines activity.

County lines drug dealing is a domestic issue, so our engagement with international partners on this is limited. However, we engage with the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime and other international partners on a range of drug policy issues.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
3 Nov 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what operational support her Department provides for police forces to (a) identify and (b) tackle county lines drugs gangs.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why we are investing a dedicated £40m this year to tackle drugs supply and county lines and surge our activity against these ruthless gangs bringing our total dedicated investment to over £65m since November 2019.

Tackling drugs supply and county lines is a key priority for police and law enforcement agencies who receive core funding to respond to a range of serious and organised crime threats, including drugs supply. In total, the Home Office budget for 21/22 is £14.2bn, which includes funding for policing and fire, securing the borders and controlling immigration and issuing passports and visas.

The £40m investment provided this financial year has allowed us to expand and build upon our successful County Lines Programme which, since launching in November 2019, has already seen more than 1,500 lines closed, over 7,400 arrests, £4.3 million in cash and significant quantities of drugs seized, and more than 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded.

Our programme investment includes funding the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre to improve the intelligence picture and co-ordinate the national law enforcement response. We have also increased disruption on the rail networks through the British Transport Police’s dedicated County Lines Taskforce and directly fund police intensification in the top three exporting areas (the Metropolitan Police Service, Merseyside Police, and West Midlands Police). In addition, this year we have established a dedicated fund to help local police forces tackle the scourge of county lines. We are also funding specialist support for young people at risk of county lines exploitation and their families.

Lastly, we are funding the MPS-led Social Media Hub which brings together a dedicated team of police officers and staff who work with Social Media platforms to tackle gang related serious violence perpetrated online, including county lines activity.

County lines drug dealing is a domestic issue, so our engagement with international partners on this is limited. However, we engage with the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime and other international partners on a range of drug policy issues.


Written Question
Drugs: Organised Crime
3 Nov 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to tackle county lines drugs gangs.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

This Government is determined to crack down on the county lines gangs who are exploiting our children and have a devastating impact on our communities. That is why we are investing a dedicated £40m this year to tackle drugs supply and county lines and surge our activity against these ruthless gangs bringing our total dedicated investment to over £65m since November 2019.

Tackling drugs supply and county lines is a key priority for police and law enforcement agencies who receive core funding to respond to a range of serious and organised crime threats, including drugs supply. In total, the Home Office budget for 21/22 is £14.2bn, which includes funding for policing and fire, securing the borders and controlling immigration and issuing passports and visas.

The £40m investment provided this financial year has allowed us to expand and build upon our successful County Lines Programme which, since launching in November 2019, has already seen more than 1,500 lines closed, over 7,400 arrests, £4.3 million in cash and significant quantities of drugs seized, and more than 4,000 vulnerable people safeguarded.

Our programme investment includes funding the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre to improve the intelligence picture and co-ordinate the national law enforcement response. We have also increased disruption on the rail networks through the British Transport Police’s dedicated County Lines Taskforce and directly fund police intensification in the top three exporting areas (the Metropolitan Police Service, Merseyside Police, and West Midlands Police). In addition, this year we have established a dedicated fund to help local police forces tackle the scourge of county lines. We are also funding specialist support for young people at risk of county lines exploitation and their families.

Lastly, we are funding the MPS-led Social Media Hub which brings together a dedicated team of police officers and staff who work with Social Media platforms to tackle gang related serious violence perpetrated online, including county lines activity.

County lines drug dealing is a domestic issue, so our engagement with international partners on this is limited. However, we engage with the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime and other international partners on a range of drug policy issues.


Written Question
Football: Racial Discrimination
27 Sep 2021

Questioner: Lord Taylor of Warwick (Non-affiliated - Life peer)

Question

To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include racism in football as a priority in the Hate Crime Unit; and what resources they will provide to that Unit.

Answered by Lord Greenhalgh

The Government takes all forms of hate crime very seriously. We are clear that victims of racially motivated abuse should be supported and that the individuals who carry out these hateful attacks should be brought to justice.

The Government is working with prominent footballers to understand more about the abuse they suffer on social media. We will continue to work with the Police, football representatives and those affected directly, to tackle this vile abuse, both on and off the football pitch.

We will outline our next steps in the forthcoming Hate Crime Strategy.




Written Question
South Africa: Civil Disorder
6 Sep 2021

Questioner: Rachael Maskell (LAB - York Central)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assistance his Department has provided to UK nationals residing in areas of South Africa affected by recent violence and looting; and what advice his Department is offering to those who may be trapped in their homes as a result of that disruption without access to food and essential supplies.

Answered by James Duddridge

We are concerned by the recent violence in South Africa. The UK supports President Ramaphosa's emphasis on the importance of the rule of law. The Integrated Review sets out the UK's commitment to fighting threats to democratic values and open societies around the world.

The South African Government put a number of measures in place to restore calm and secure shopping malls, petrol stations and key transport routes, including the deployment of the South African National Defence Force to support the police.

We regularly encourage British nationals in South Africa to monitor FCDO travel advice, as well as local media for real-time information about their area. We updated our travel advice continuously during the unrest in July, including via our social media channels. For British Nationals requiring assistance in South Africa our High Commission is contactable 24/7. They can call +27 12 421 7500 and follow the prompts for consular assistance.


Written Question
Human Trafficking
27 Jul 2021

Questioner: Jonathan Lord (CON - Woking)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle people smuggling.

Answered by Chris Philp

The Government stands resolute in its commitment to tackle Organised Immigration Crime (OIC). We continue to pursue the Organised Crime Groups (OCGs) who facilitate illegal travel to the UK and who exploit vulnerable migrants, knowingly putting people in life-threatening situations.

In March 2021, the Government published the New Plan for Immigration containing provisions to establish legislation to deter illegal entry into the UK, thereby breaking the business model of criminal people smuggling networks and protecting the lives of those they endanger. In July 2021, the Government introduced this legislation through the Nationality and Borders Bill.

We continue to take action against the highly dangerous and illegal entry methods facilitated by these gangss. Police patrols on French beaches and enhanced intelligence sharing between our security and law enforcement agencies has helped to prevent around 8,000 people from making the Channel crossing to the UK so far this year

The Government has taken steps to tackle organised crime on social media platforms, reducing the space in which gangss operate. In March 2021, I met with the National Crime Agency and senior representatives from social media companies to discuss how they can more effectively tackle oraganised crime online and a planned approach is being finalised.

Reinforcing this commitment, in June 2021 the Home Secretary wrote to CEOs of key social media companies urging them to do substantially more to proactively identify and remove posts promoting organised crime , particularly illegal Channel crossings.


Written Question
Twitter: Racial Discrimination
19 Jul 2021

Questioner: Michael Fabricant (CON - Lichfield)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will (a) commission an investigation through her Department's agencies into the proportion of the racist tweets directed at three England football players following the UEFA Euro 2020 final that originated in the UK and (b) publish a report following that investigation.

Answered by Kit Malthouse

Racist abuse is utterly unacceptable whether it takes place online or offline. Individuals who commit racist offences should face the full force of the law and we already have robust legislation in place to deal with online hate crime.

While companies have taken some positive steps, more needs to be done to tackle online harms, including hate crime. The upcoming Online Safety regulatory framework will put in place measures to tackle illegal and legal but harmful abuse, including racist abuse. If major platforms do not meet their own standards to keep people safe and address abuse quickly and effectively, they could face enforcement action. There is no reason for companies to wait until the regime is fully running to take action against this abhorrent abuse, and we will continue to press them to do so.

The police are reviewing offending material and will work with the relevant social media companies to identify account holders and progress their investigations.


Written Question
Public Duty Costs Allowance
15 Jun 2021

Questioner: Rupa Huq (LAB - Ealing Central and Acton)

Question

To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what audit process his Department undertakes on claims made under the Public Duty Cost Allowance by former prime ministers; and what steps his Department takes to ensure that those claims meet the criteria for funding from that allowance.

Answered by Julia Lopez

As with any other Cabinet Office financial transaction, PDCA payments are subject to inspection by the Government Internal Audit Agency (GIAA) and the National Audit Office (NAO). The amount paid to each former Prime Minister is disclosed each year in the Department’s Annual Report and Accounts following full audit.

The costs are a reimbursement of incurred expenses for necessary office and secretarial costs. These costs can include diary support, Met Police protection on public visits, correspondence, staffing at public visits, support to charitable work, social media platforms and managing and maintaining ex-PMs office (staff, payroll, admin).


Written Question
Domestic Abuse: Victims
11 Jun 2021

Questioner: Kieran Mullan (CON - Crewe and Nantwich)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking with the Secretary of State for Justice to support victims of domestic abuse.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

This government is committed to tackling domestic abuse, which is why we recently passed the landmark Domestic Abuse Act, to support and protect all victims of domestic abuse. Alongside this, this year we will publish a domestic abuse strategy that will go beyond the implementation of the Act to help transform our response to domestic abuse; to prevent offending, protect victims and ensure they have the support they need.

We know that victims of domestic abuse may feel particularly vulnerable at this time, which is why last year the Government launched our #YouAreNotAlone awareness raising campaign to signpost support available. The campaign has reached over 30 million UK adults and has been seen by over 130 million followers on social media.

In January, we also launched the ‘Ask for ANI’ Codeword scheme to enable domestic abuse victims to seek victim focussed support, including engagement with specialist victim support services and the police as necessary. Over 5,000 pharmacies across the nation are now participating in the scheme, and the scheme has been used by over 60 victims and survivors.

We have provided unprecedented new funding to victim support services to ensure that they have the capacity to provide support to victims and adapt their operational capacity in light of the impacts of the Covid-19 Pandemic. To that end we have awarded £27 million in additional funds to support domestic abuse services last financial year alone, comprising £25 million from the government’s £76 million in emergency funding for the most vulnerable in society, and an extra £2 million from the Home Office in April 2021 to bolster the capacity of domestic abuse organisations affected by the pandemic.

In November 2020 the Ministry of Justice announced a further £11 million towards a range of services offering practical and emotional help – allowing domestic abuse and specialist rape organisations to recruit more staff, adapt to remote counselling methods during the pandemic and keep helplines open for longer.

In 2021-22, the Ministry of Justice will provide just under £151m for victim and witness support services. This includes an extra £51m to increase support for rape and domestic abuse victims, building on the emergency funding from this financial year to help domestic abuse and sexual violence services meet Covid-driven demand. Of this funding, £27 million will go to creating more than 700 new posts for Independent Sexual Violence and Independent Domestic Abuse Advisers helping us to meet demand for support from victims.


Written Question
Gender Based Violence
11 Jun 2021

Questioner: Kieran Mullan (CON - Crewe and Nantwich)

Question

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to tackle violence against women and girls.

Answered by Victoria Atkins

This government is committed to tackling domestic abuse, which is why we recently passed the landmark Domestic Abuse Act, to support and protect all victims of domestic abuse. Alongside this, this year we will publish a domestic abuse strategy that will go beyond the implementation of the Act to help transform our response to domestic abuse; to prevent offending, protect victims and ensure they have the support they need.

We know that victims of domestic abuse may feel particularly vulnerable at this time, which is why last year the Government launched our #YouAreNotAlone awareness raising campaign to signpost support available. The campaign has reached over 30 million UK adults and has been seen by over 130 million followers on social media.

In January, we also launched the ‘Ask for ANI’ Codeword scheme to enable domestic abuse victims to seek victim focussed support, including engagement with specialist victim support services and the police as necessary. Over 5,000 pharmacies across the nation are now participating in the scheme, and the scheme has been used by over 60 victims and survivors.

We have provided unprecedented new funding to victim support services to ensure that they have the capacity to provide support to victims and adapt their operational capacity in light of the impacts of the Covid-19 Pandemic. To that end we have awarded £27 million in additional funds to support domestic abuse services last financial year alone, comprising £25 million from the government’s £76 million in emergency funding for the most vulnerable in society, and an extra £2 million from the Home Office in April 2021 to bolster the capacity of domestic abuse organisations affected by the pandemic.

In November 2020 the Ministry of Justice announced a further £11 million towards a range of services offering practical and emotional help – allowing domestic abuse and specialist rape organisations to recruit more staff, adapt to remote counselling methods during the pandemic and keep helplines open for longer.

In 2021-22, the Ministry of Justice will provide just under £151m for victim and witness support services. This includes an extra £51m to increase support for rape and domestic abuse victims, building on the emergency funding from this financial year to help domestic abuse and sexual violence services meet Covid-driven demand. Of this funding, £27 million will go to creating more than 700 new posts for Independent Sexual Violence and Independent Domestic Abuse Advisers helping us to meet demand for support from victims.