Baroness Hayman of Ullock Portrait

Baroness Hayman of Ullock

Labour - Life peer

Opposition Whip (Lords)

(since October 2020)

Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)

(since October 2020)
4 APPG memberships (as of 6 Oct 2021)
Banning Trophy Hunting, Environment, Human-Relevant Science, Slovenia
3 Former APPG memberships
Choir, Nuclear Energy, Rural Business
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Feb 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Flooding and Coastal Communities)
10th Oct 2016 - 9th Feb 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
18th Sep 2015 - 10th Oct 2016
Justice Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Environment Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 96 Labour Aye votes vs 1 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 202 Noes - 210
Speeches
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Environment Bill

My Lords, when the Minister, Rebecca Pow, introduced the government amendments in the other place last week she said:

“The …

Written Answers
Tuesday 6th July 2021
Care Homes: Visits
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the changes in their guidance on the number of visitors permissible to care …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Monday 4th March 2019
Medicines
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Human Medicines (Amendment) Regulations 2019 (S.I., 2019, No. …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Baroness Hayman of Ullock has voted in 118 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(45 debate interactions)
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(15 debate interactions)
Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist (Conservative)
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(2 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(1 debate contributions)
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View all Baroness Hayman of Ullock's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Hayman of Ullock, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Hayman of Ullock has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Hayman of Ullock has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Hayman of Ullock has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Hayman of Ullock has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


41 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
27th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government over what period was the £71 million funding invested in research by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research; how much of this funding has been spent on administrative costs; and how much of this funding has been spent on projects where refinement of the use of animals in research was the primary focus.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. I will correspond directly with the noble Baroness.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the use of unenriched hen cages in Australia, (2) how such cages comply with British standards, and (3) whether eggs and egg products from hens caged this way will qualify for zero import tariffs under the in-principle Free Trade Agreement agreed on 15 June.

The Government is committed to scrutiny of animal welfare considerations in FTAs through a range of measures, including relative animal welfare standards. This includes standards and industry practices for Australian egg production. Conventional (“battery”) cages for laying hens have been banned in the UK since 2012.

The Free Trade Agreement will contain a commitment to an Animal Welfare Working Group to provide a forum for ongoing cooperation and initiatives in areas of mutual interest, to review animal welfare developments and to promote high animal welfare practices.

The UK tariff treatment for pigs, poultry and eggs from Australia is not yet determined.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 12 April (HL14638), when they intend to publish the Review of the Evidence for Sentience in Decapod Crustaceans and Cephalopod Molluscs; and whether the date of publication will allow its findings to be incorporated into the Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill [HL].

There is clear evidence that animals with a backbone (vertebrates) are sentient and this is reflected in the Government’s Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill introduced to the House of Lords on 13 May 2021. However, the Bill also gives the Secretary of State a power to extend the recognition of sentience to particular invertebrates in future on the basis of evidence.

Defra has commissioned an independent review of the available scientific evidence on sentience in decapod crustaceans such as crabs and lobsters, as well as sentience in the class, Cephalopoda, which includes octopus, cuttlefish and squid. The review will report shortly. We look forward to receiving its conclusions, which we will respond to as part of our ongoing work to protect the welfare needs of animals.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) what progress they have made strengthening legal protections for farmed aquatic animals at the time of slaughter, and (2) what plans they have to introduce (a) specific protections in Welfare of Animals at the Time of Killing regulations, or (b) any other legislation in this area.

Regulation 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing requires that farmed fish are spared avoidable pain, distress or suffering during their killing and related operations. Now we have left the EU we have the opportunity to consider whether detailed regulation is needed.

We have recently concluded a review of the welfare of animals at the time of killing legislation and this identified potential improvements that might be made, including on the welfare of farmed fish at slaughter. We are carefully considering issues raised in the review.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to set a timetable for establishing a regulatory mechanism for imposing extended producer responsibility on the tobacco industry.

New research conducted by Eunomia for Defra and the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) indicates that cleaning up littered cigarette butts currently costs litter authorities in the UK around £40 million per year, rising to £46 million when including those disposed of in public bins.

We have recently announced our intention to explore regulatory options to ensure that the tobacco industry takes sufficient financial responsibility for the toxic litter created by its products. Supported by the Department of Health and Social Care, Defra is now actively exploring the suitability of regulatory options to reduce tobacco litter and we plan to conduct further research this year.

This research will help inform next steps and we therefore cannot yet confirm a timescale. The Government will continue to work closely with stakeholders to address the issue. Government policy in this area must be developed in accordance with the World Health Organisation Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and its guidelines.

The Environment Bill will allow us to legislate for extended producer responsibility schemes, which could include requiring cigarette producers to pay the full disposal costs of products or materials that they place on the market, including littered cigarette butts.

Cigarette and tobacco product packaging will already be covered by the reforms to the packaging producer responsibility scheme, which are currently open for consultation.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish regulatory mechanisms for imposing extended producer responsibility on the tobacco industry; and how any such plans will ensure the industry takes financial responsibility for the costs associated with discarded cigarette butts.

New research conducted by Eunomia for Defra and the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) indicates that cleaning up littered cigarette butts currently costs litter authorities in the UK around £40 million per year, rising to £46 million when including those disposed of in public bins.

We have recently announced our intention to explore regulatory options to ensure that the tobacco industry takes sufficient financial responsibility for the toxic litter created by its products. Supported by the Department of Health and Social Care, Defra is now actively exploring the suitability of regulatory options to reduce tobacco litter and we plan to conduct further research this year.

This research will help inform next steps and we therefore cannot yet confirm a timescale. The Government will continue to work closely with stakeholders to address the issue. Government policy in this area must be developed in accordance with the World Health Organisation Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and its guidelines.

The Environment Bill will allow us to legislate for extended producer responsibility schemes, which could include requiring cigarette producers to pay the full disposal costs of products or materials that they place on the market, including littered cigarette butts.

Cigarette and tobacco product packaging will already be covered by the reforms to the packaging producer responsibility scheme, which are currently open for consultation.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to provide for animal sentience in law; and if so, whether the definition of animals in that law (1) will be the same as that for vertebrates in the Animal Welfare Act 2006, and (2) will include decapods and cephalopods.

This Government has a manifesto commitment to introduce new laws on animal sentience, which we will do as soon as parliamentary time allows.

The current science is clear that vertebrates can experience pain and suffering. It is on that basis that the definition of "animal" in the Animal Welfare Act 2006 is limited only to vertebrates. Defra has commissioned an independent external review of the available scientific evidence on sentience in decapods and cephalopods. This review is expected to report shortly.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to provide legal protections for aquatic animals.

There is a range of legislation already in place to protect aquatic animals including the Salmon & Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975, Eels Regulations 2009, Conservation of Seals Act 1970, the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 and the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981.

The Joint Nature Conservation Committee has recently commenced the seventh Quinquennial Review of Schedules 5 and 8 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Later this year, JNCC will make evidence-based recommendations to the Secretary of State as to which species warrant additional legal protections to secure their future conservation. The Government will consider any recommendations to add species to Schedule 5 or 8, at this point, once these recommendations have been submitted.

Further, the Fisheries Act's ecosystems objective contains a requirement to "minimise, and where possible eliminate bycatch of sensitive marine species". We will set out policies that will help to achieve this objective in the Joint Fisheries Statement, which is a UK-wide document.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to investigate any differences reported in the application of Higher Level Stewardship extensions on common land.

We are offering extensions of one year to suitable expiring Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) agreements, as an alternative to entry into the Countryside Stewardship Scheme, ahead of the introduction of new schemes such as Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery.

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) published the criteria used to offer HLS extensions which can be found on the GOV.UK website.

We understand that some may not agree with the decision so we have included an opportunity to review decisions not to offer an extension formally. We know that the position on common land is more complex and RPA is working closely with Natural England and commoners to resolve any differences of opinion.

16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they intend to provide to Higher Level Stewardship agreement holders to ensure a smooth transition to the Environmental Land Management Scheme.

There are a range of options being provided to help farmers continue to manage their land sustainably and prepare to take part in new schemes as they are introduced.

Defra will be offering certain Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) agreement holders the opportunity to extend their agreements as their existing agreements expire, if they wish to do so and meet the extension criteria. The criteria ensure that the agreements continue to deliver positive environmental outcomes and protect our Priority Habitats and SSSIs.

Additionally, it is now possible for HLS agreement holders to apply for the Countryside Stewardship Capital grants offer alongside their HLS agreement, where they wish to undertake new works. Alternatively, agreement holders can apply for a new five-year Countryside Stewardship agreement if they want to make changes to their land management options.

These opportunities will help to bridge the gap between current agreements and the start of the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes, ensuring a continuation of both environmental benefits, and funding for agreement holders.

16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of their decision to delay the requirement for export health certificates for Products of Animal Origin on the ability of the British Veterinary Association’s members to prevent disease incursion to the UK.

There are no biosecurity risks from delay. The agreement reached with the EU means the UK and EU have highly similar animal and plant health measures, now the transition period has ended.

Moving forward, we are committed to maintaining high biosecurity, food safety and animal welfare standards. This includes the introduction of the staged SPS controls.

In advance of the implementation of the new regime of checks, we already have controls in place on high risk goods. This includes Products of Animal Origin that are subject to additional safeguard measures, and the Government remains able to take emergency safeguard action at very short notice to prohibit or restrict the importation of certain products from certain countries following an outbreak of disease or a public health issue, such as avian influenza.

16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what compensation they provide, if any, to commoners when Natural England make a decision that curtails economic activity on a common on the basis that it contains a site of special scientific interest.

Natural England must notify all owners and occupiers where it considers an area to be of special interest (notification of Sites of Special Scientific Interest – SSSIs). This will usually follow informal discussion, including discussion about management. Consensus between regulators, land managers, users and other stakeholders is generally required to deliver positive conservation outcomes for SSSIs. Countryside Stewardship currently provides the principal mechanism to help private land managers meet the cost of any positive management needed to restore SSSIs to, or maintain them in, favourable condition.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish (1) the conclusions of their consultation, and (2) any proposed changes in policy, following the call for evidence on the non-elephant ivory trade.

The summary of responses to the call for evidence on non-elephant ivory trade was published on 10 November 2020. We are currently considering this evidence and plan to consult on potential policy options later in the year.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ban (1) sales, and (2) imports, of foie gras.

The Government has made clear that the production of foie gras from ducks or geese raises serious welfare concerns.

Production is banned in the UK as it is incompatible with domestic legislation including the Animal Welfare Act 2006 which makes it a criminal offence not to provide for an animal's welfare needs and to allow an animal to suffer unnecessarily.

Now our future relationship with the European Union has been established the Government is considering the further steps it could take in relation to foie gras.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what specific tests they plan to use to determine whether or not tobacco industry plans for a voluntary approach to preventing littering of cigarette filters will be sufficient; and what plans they have to assess such plans against the potential benefits of a mandatory extended producer responsibility scheme.

We believe that the tobacco industry must take responsibility for the litter created by its products. Our most recent composition survey found cigarette butts represent 66% of all littered items.

Preliminary research has shown an estimated cost to UK local authorities and other duty bodies of £40m per annum for the collection and disposal of littered cigarette butts, rising to £46m when including those disposed of in public bins. This has been drawn from an analysis of local authority spend on litter using local authority revenue outturns, litter composition studies across the UK and local authority surveys and interviews. This research is undergoing quality assurance and will be published in due course.

We have made clear that we will continue to monitor the available evidence on smoking related litter and that if it continues to be a significant environmental concern we will reflect on the steps Government can take to ensure that the tobacco industry takes more responsibility. Measures in the Environment Bill will allow us to legislate for an extended producer responsibility scheme for tobacco products, if such an intervention was considered necessary.

Cigarette and tobacco product packaging will be covered by the upcoming reforms to the packaging producer responsibility scheme.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the costs incurred by local authorities in dealing with cigarette butts when littered or disposed of in public bins; what that cost is estimated to be; and what is the basis on which any such cost has been calculated.

We believe that the tobacco industry must take responsibility for the litter created by its products. Our most recent composition survey found cigarette butts represent 66% of all littered items.

Preliminary research has shown an estimated cost to UK local authorities and other duty bodies of £40m per annum for the collection and disposal of littered cigarette butts, rising to £46m when including those disposed of in public bins. This has been drawn from an analysis of local authority spend on litter using local authority revenue outturns, litter composition studies across the UK and local authority surveys and interviews. This research is undergoing quality assurance and will be published in due course.

We have made clear that we will continue to monitor the available evidence on smoking related litter and that if it continues to be a significant environmental concern we will reflect on the steps Government can take to ensure that the tobacco industry takes more responsibility. Measures in the Environment Bill will allow us to legislate for an extended producer responsibility scheme for tobacco products, if such an intervention was considered necessary.

Cigarette and tobacco product packaging will be covered by the upcoming reforms to the packaging producer responsibility scheme.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the new responsibilities for local authorities set out in the Environment Bill.

We have committed to fully fund all new burdens on local authorities arising from the Environment Bill in order to make our ambition a reality.

We have worked closely with local authorities to develop the Bill, and are committed to engaging with local authorities as we seek to maximise effective delivery, for example as we consult further on the implementation of measures on extended producer responsibility, deposit return schemes and biodiversity net gain.

Local authorities, as local leaders, experts, place-shapers and conveners of local communities, will play a fundamental role in delivering the environmental action needed in their areas. They will be supported in delivering this change through increased powers to take effective action, reduced financial burdens from waste management and stronger abilities to improve nature, health and social outcomes for local citizens.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether producers will be required to pay local authorities the full net cost of the waste management at end of life of the products and materials specified in the waste and resource efficiency proposals set out in the Environment Bill.

In the 2018 Resources and Waste Strategy we set out our ambitions of doubling resource productivity and eliminating avoidable waste by 2050. To help us achieve these and other ambitions, we are taking powers in the Environment Bill to enable us through regulations, to require those who place specified products or materials on the UK market to meet, or contribute to, the cost of managing these products at end of life. These powers are in addition to the resource efficiency powers in the Environment Bill.

We are starting with reforming the packaging producer responsibility regulations and will introduce extended producer responsibility for packaging. This will see packaging producers paying for the waste management costs associated with the packaging that they place on the market. This includes those costs currently borne by local authorities for managing packaging waste disposed of by households

We consulted on our initial proposals in 2019 and will be publishing a second consultation this year.

Additionally, we have committed to review and consult on measures such as extended producer responsibility and product standards for five new waste streams, by the end of 2025. These are: textiles, bulky household items (such as mattresses and furniture), construction materials, tyres, and fishing gear. Where extended producer responsibility is identified as the preferred policy approach then businesses placing products on the market can expect to be required to meet or contribute to waste management costs including costs incurred by local authorities.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that local councils scan cats collected as a result of road traffic accidents for microchips.

It is established good practice for local authorities to scan any cat or dog found on the streets so that the owner can be informed. Cats Protection report that 80% of councils in England routinely scan cats involved in accidents.

Additionally, Highways England has clear guidelines for contractors to follow when they find a deceased cat or dog. This process is designed with owners in mind, giving them the best chance of being informed of the incident to allow closure. The process is laid out in the Network Management Manual and in 2015 the necessary arrangements were made in all Highways England’s contracts to collect and identify cats and dogs killed on the strategic road network and to contact their owners.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to inform cat owners of (1) the need to be aware of (a) non-compliant, and (b) non-DEFRA-approved, microchip databases, and (2) the implications of registering their details on such a database.

Under the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015, the Defra Secretary of State has powers to ensure database operators meet the requirements under the regulations. The Secretary of State may also authorise in writing "an authorised person", such as a local authority or police constable, to act for the purpose of enforcing these regulations. Defra can therefore work with authorised persons and enforcement agencies, such as Trading Standards, to deal with non-compliant databases.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare of cats and is committed to introducing the compulsory microchipping of cats. Cat owners can ensure that they register with a compliant database by using any of the microchipping databases listed on GOV.UK.

Defra is also conducting a Post Implementation Review of The Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015 which will consider the operation of the microchip databases.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that (1) non-compliant, and (2) non-DEFRA-approved, animal microchip databases are shut down.

Under the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015, the Defra Secretary of State has powers to ensure database operators meet the requirements under the regulations. The Secretary of State may also authorise in writing "an authorised person", such as a local authority or police constable, to act for the purpose of enforcing these regulations. Defra can therefore work with authorised persons and enforcement agencies, such as Trading Standards, to deal with non-compliant databases.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare of cats and is committed to introducing the compulsory microchipping of cats. Cat owners can ensure that they register with a compliant database by using any of the microchipping databases listed on GOV.UK.

Defra is also conducting a Post Implementation Review of The Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015 which will consider the operation of the microchip databases.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage cat owners (1) to microchip their cats, and (2) to keep registered microchip contact details up to date.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare of cats and has a manifesto commitment to introduce compulsory microchipping of cats. Defra launched a consultation in December 2020 on the compulsory microchipping and scanning of cats, and scanning of dogs in England which ended on 17 February. We are currently analysing the responses to the consultation and we will issue our response to it later this year.

The Government advises owners to follow the statutory welfare code for cats which advises that microchipping a cat gives them the best chance of being identified, and reunited with their owner if injured or lost. The code of practice for the welfare of cats can be found in the attached document.

Cat owners can ensure that they register with a compliant database by using any of the microchipping databases listed on GOV.UK.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement of delays to the consideration of the Environment Bill, what assessment they have made of the impact on the proposed deadline of 31 October 2022 in that Bill for establishing long-term environmental targets; and what steps they are taking, if any, to ensure that such deadlines are met if the Bill has not been given Royal Assent by 31 October 2022.

The Environment Bill requires that Statutory Instruments setting out the targets must be brought forwards by 31 October 2022 and will come into force once approved by Parliament. Work is continuing to meet this deadline.

We will continue to develop targets through the robust, evidence-led process set out in our policy paper, published in August 2020. This timetable is unaffected by the pause to the Bill. This process seeks independent expert advice, provides a role for stakeholders and the public, as well as scrutiny from Parliament. We are working towards a public consultation that will include proposed targets and an assessment of their impacts in early 2022.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Boxing Day hunts will be allowed to take place this year; and if so, what enforcement measures will be in place to ensure compliance of such hunts with the law.

Organised outdoor sports and activities can take place in all tiers under the Covid-19 response tier system, and should be organised according to the rules of the tier in which the activity is taking place.

As such, trail hunting and hunting carried out under the exemptions in the Hunting Act 2004 can take place where permitted by the landowner. The enforcement of the Hunting Act is an operational matter for the police.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether visitors to care homes will need to be tested for COVID-19 after 21 June 2021.

Testing is crucial to help protect the people who are the most vulnerable to COVID-19 by identifying those who may unknowingly have the virus - enabling those who test positive and their contacts to self-isolate and break the chain of transmission.

To support effective infection prevention and control in care homes, care home visitors should continue to test, using rapid lateral flow tests in line with the current policy and produce a negative COVID test prior to their visit. In accordance with the roadmap, further announcements on policy from 21st June will be made in due course. Infection prevention and control measures, including testing, will continue to be important for protecting care home residents while ensuring we allow as much visiting as possible.

26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to encourage care homes to grant more Essential Caregiver status requests.

Our guidance for care homes on visiting and admissions, updated on 17 June, makes clear that all care home residents should be able to nominate an ‘essential care giver’ who may visit the home to attend to essential care needs. Care home managers should work with residents to allow them to nominate the care giver and visits from these individuals should always be supported, including during periods of self-isolation, for example, following an overnight stay in hospital.

If a resident or their relative feels that the care home is not following visiting guidance, they should raise the matter with the home. If they are not satisfied that the issue is resolved, the Care Quality Commission can look into any complaints.

26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the changes in their guidance on the number of visitors permissible to care homes on 17 May, what steps they are taking to provide care homes with additional resources to support any increase in the number of visitors to such homes.

Throughout the pandemic, we have provided almost £2 billion in specific funding for adult social care. This consists of the Infection Control Fund, the Rapid Testing Fund and the Workforce Capacity Fund.

The Government will continue to monitor COVID-19 pressures on the sector and will keep future funding under review.

27th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the UK’s departure from the EU, what assessment have they made of regulatory guidelines for the use of a second animal species in regulatory toxicology studies.

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will announce a timetable for the re-introduction of close contact care home visits in England.

New visiting arrangements will start on 8 March. From then, every care home resident will be able to nominate one named person who can have regular, indoor visits. Those with highest care needs can also nominate an ‘essential family carer’.

We will continue to look carefully at the latest data and set out plans for the next phase of visits for people in residential care.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the current occupancy rates of care homes in England.

The Department receives data on spare capacity on a voluntary basis from care homes. However, this data is not sufficiently accurate to provide a comprehensive assessment of national spare capacity.

11th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend the indemnity on visits that has been granted to designated care homes which care for patients recovering from COVID-19 to all care settings; and whether this indemnity will be made permanent.

The Designated Settings Indemnity Support (DSIS) was introduced specifically to enable those care homes assured, or intending to be assured, by the Care Quality Commission as Designated Settings and which are unable to obtain sufficient insurance, to overcome this barrier to accepting infectious COVID-19 positive patients from the National Health Service. It is a targeted, temporary measure to boost capacity in these settings and support wider NHS discharges in response to current pandemic pressures. The support will run until the end of March 2021, with a review point in mid-February. The DSIS is not, therefore, a permanent or sector-wide intervention.

We recognise that the wider adult social care insurance market is changing in response to the pandemic and that some care providers may encounter difficulties as their policies come up for renewal. We are working closely across Government, with care providers and insurance representatives to understand the breadth and severity of these wider issues, including those related to visiting and whether there is any further action the Government should take.

4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include family members of care home residents in Category 6 of their COVID-19 vaccination first phase priority groups.

The Government has no current plans to revise the phase one priority groups to include all family members of care home residents. Family members and other care home visitors will continue to be prioritised following the wider Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation advice.

4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the concerns expressed by the Alzheimer’s Society on 1 February about the impact of delaying the second dose of COVID-19 vaccination on care home residents.

Both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccines provide a high degree of protection after the first dose. The decision to update the dosing interval is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and is designed to save lives. It was made following a thorough review of the data and was in line with the recommendations of the UK’s four Chief Medical Officers. The JCVI advised that we should prioritise giving as many people in at-risk groups their first dose, rather than providing two doses in as short a time as possible.

4th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to lay before Parliament the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 drafted by the Joint Committee on Human Rights.

The Government acknowledges the drafted regulations and responded to the Joint Committee on Human Rights regarding them on 22 February 2021. Although we have considered using these regulations to help allow care home visiting, we have decided to pursue non-legislative routes, which allow us to move more swiftly in changing circumstances and to accommodate all care homes.

We recognise the very significant impact that restricting visiting in care homes and mental health settings has had on residents, their family and loved ones.

We are taking a carefully balanced, step-by-step approach to opening up more visiting opportunities. New visiting arrangements started on 8 March and every care home should enable each resident to nominate one named person who can make regular, indoor visits.

Those residents with the highest care needs can also nominate an “Essential Care Giver” who will be able to visit more often in order to provide essential care. They will have the same testing and personal protective equipment arrangements as care home staff.

Our guidance makes clear that care homes should support this visiting as the default. We are working with the care home sector to encourage and enable care homes to do so.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of Methodist Homes' care home visitor policy.

On 1 December, we published updated online only guidance to enable more meaningful indoor visits to take place for care home residents across all tiers. This is enabled by providing testing to visitors, which will be available before Christmas. It is a matter for care providers to make decisions about their visiting policy, based on the national guidance.

The guidance enables care home providers, families and local professionals to work together to find the right balance between the benefits of visiting on wellbeing and quality of life, and the risk of transmission of COVID-19 to vulnerable residents and social care staff.

When developing this policy, we have engaged with a range of stakeholders from across the sector including the Methodist Home Association.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial support they intend to provide to care homes to enable such homes to offer twice weekly tests to two visitors for each care home resident.

The Department is providing a tailored training and guidance package for care homes in order to support them to establish effective testing regimes. We have made £4.6 billion available to local authorities so they can address pressures on local services caused by the pandemic, including in adult social care.

In addition, the Infection Control Fund, set up in May, has been extended until March 2021, with an extra £546 million for the care sector to take key steps to improve infection prevention and control. As per the grant conditions, this funding may be used for supporting safe visiting in care homes.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they estimate that family members and friends of care home residents will be provided with twice weekly testing to enable them to visit; and whether they still plan to implement that policy before 25 December.

We want to bring an end to the pain of separation and help care homes bring families and loved ones together. The launch of visitor testing is a crucial step to making that happen.

Testing is only one way of minimising the risk of visiting a care home. If a visitor has a negative test, is wearing appropriate personal protective equipment and following other infection control measures, then it will be possible for family and friends to visit care homes.

Following a successful trial in 20 care homes, we have started the phased rollout of new rapid tests to all care homes across England to support visiting. The first 385 care homes are now able to begin testing visitors and we aim to roll this out to all care homes by Christmas.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to offer COVID-19 vaccinations to family carers of care home residents.

Work has taken place to ensure we have the logistical expertise, transport, and workforce to rollout a vaccine, at the speed at which it can be manufactured. In line with the recommendations of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), the vaccine will be initially rolled out to priority groups, including care home residents and staff, people over 80 years old, and health and care workers. The vaccine will then be prioritised amongst the rest of the population in order of age and risk, including those who are clinically extremely vulnerable and all individuals aged 16-64 years old with underlying health conditions.

The JCVI appreciates that operational considerations, such as minimising wastage, may require deviation from the prioritisation order as outlined in the statement, where decisions are taken in consultation with national or local public health advice. We will follow the advice of the JCVI on clinical prioritisation, which supports vaccinating those most at risk of death from COVID-19.

1st Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in ensuring that care homes are granted insurance indemnity under the same terms as provided for the NHS under the Coronavirus Act 2020.

We recognise that the adult social care insurance market is changing in response to the pandemic. We are working closely across Government, with care providers and insurance representatives to understand the breadth and severity of the issues, and whether there is any action the Government should take to support the sector.