Lord Austin of Dudley Portrait

Lord Austin of Dudley

Non-affiliated - Life peer

Panel of Chairs
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Foreign Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 19th Mar 2019
Education Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Education, Skills and the Economy Sub-Committee
25th Nov 2015 - 9th Mar 2016
Home Affairs Committee
4th Nov 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
7th Oct 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Planning)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (West Midlands)
5th Oct 2008 - 6th May 2010
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
5th Oct 2008 - 9th Jun 2009


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th April 2022
Nationality and Borders Bill
voted No
One of 5 Independent No votes vs 4 Independent Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 216 Noes - 221
Speeches
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Shireen Abu Aqla
My Lords, the scenes at the funeral were terrible but it is completely wrong for people to attribute all the …
Written Answers
Thursday 7th April 2022
Iran: Sanctions
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) possibility, and (2) impact, of sanctions on …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 16th July 2019
TWELVE-TIME SNOOKER WORLD CHAMPION REANNE EVANS
That this House congratulates Reanne Evans on the outstanding achievement of winning her 12th World Women’s Snooker Championship; notes that …
Bills
Wednesday 6th December 2017
Sanctions (Human Rights Abuse and Corruption) Bill 2017-19
A Bill to enable the Secretary of State to refuse entry, or to vary or curtail leave to enter or …
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Monday 4th November 2019
Into Film
That this House recognises the achievements of Into Film in giving every child and young person aged 5 to 19 …
Supported Legislation
Leasehold Reform Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Austin of Dudley has voted in 67 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Austin of Dudley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
(13 debate interactions)
Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay (Conservative)
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
(13 debate interactions)
Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(10 debate interactions)
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Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(8 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(3 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Austin of Dudley's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Austin of Dudley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Austin of Dudley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Austin of Dudley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Lord Austin of Dudley


A Bill to enable the Secretary of State to refuse entry, or to vary or curtail leave to enter or remain already granted, to a person who is a non-UK or non-EEA national who is known to be, or to have been, involved in gross human rights abuses or in certain acts of corruption; to make provision for financial sanctions against a person who is a non-UK or non-EEA national who is known to be, or to have been, involved in gross human rights abuses or in certain acts of corruption; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 6th December 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to establish a target for the relocation of central government functions, offices and staff from London to other parts of the United Kingdom; to make provision for implementation, monitoring and performance reporting against such a target; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 10th November 2015

39 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of jobs in the (1) manufacturing, and (2) construction, sectors which are linked to the (1) production, and (2) use, of mobile concrete batching plants.

Official data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) is not detailed enough to identify jobs linked to the production of specific products, nor can they capture jobs using or related to specific products.

In 2019 (the latest year for which we have full year estimates), manufacturing as a whole accounted for 2.7m jobs, while the Construction sector accounted for 2.3m. Approximately 14,000 of the jobs in manufacturing were in the manufacture of machinery for mining and construction.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with Ofcom about RT’s compliance with the requirements of holding a broadcasting licence in the UK.

Broadcasting regulation compliance is a matter for Ofcom, all regulatory decisions made by Ofcom are fully independent of the Government. Ofcom has an ongoing duty to ensure that all UK licenced broadcasters adhere to requirements under broadcast licence rules.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which RT complies with the requirements of holding a broadcasting licence in the UK.

Broadcasting regulation compliance is a matter for Ofcom, all regulatory decisions made by Ofcom are fully independent of the Government. Ofcom has an ongoing duty to ensure that all UK licenced broadcasters adhere to requirements under broadcast licence rules.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the way in which social media companies deal with racist abuse directed at footballers.

The Culture Secretary and Sports Minister recently led a roundtable discussion with current and former players from the Premier League, English Football League (EFL), Women’s Super League (WSL) and Women’s Championship, which discussed online racist abuse and players’ perspectives on tackling discrimination in the game.

We are clear that the online racist abuse of football players is unacceptable. We must do all we can to tackle it. We are taking steps through the online harms regulatory framework to ensure that online abuse, whether anonymous or not, is addressed. Under a new legal duty of care, companies will need to remove and limit the spread of illegal content, including illegal online abuse. All companies will need to take swift and effective action against such content.

The police have a range of legal powers to identify individuals who attempt to use anonymity to escape sanctions for online abuse, where the activity is illegal. The government is working with law enforcement to review whether the current powers are sufficient to tackle illegal anonymous abuse online. The outcome of that work will inform the government’s future position in relation to illegal anonymous online abuse

Companies providing high-risk, high-reach services will also need to undertake regular risk assessments to identify legal but harmful material on their services. These companies will need to set clear terms and conditions which explicitly state what categories of legal but harmful material they accept (and do not accept) on their service. Companies will need to enforce these terms and conditions consistently and transparently and could face enforcement action if they do not. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework, will be ready this year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the cooperation of social media companies with the police on incidents of online racist abuse.

The Culture Secretary and Sports Minister recently led a roundtable discussion with current and former players from the Premier League, English Football League (EFL), Women’s Super League (WSL) and Women’s Championship, which discussed online racist abuse and players’ perspectives on tackling discrimination in the game.

We are clear that the online racist abuse of football players is unacceptable. We must do all we can to tackle it. We are taking steps through the online harms regulatory framework to ensure that online abuse, whether anonymous or not, is addressed. Under a new legal duty of care, companies will need to remove and limit the spread of illegal content, including illegal online abuse. All companies will need to take swift and effective action against such content.

The police have a range of legal powers to identify individuals who attempt to use anonymity to escape sanctions for online abuse, where the activity is illegal. The government is working with law enforcement to review whether the current powers are sufficient to tackle illegal anonymous abuse online. The outcome of that work will inform the government’s future position in relation to illegal anonymous online abuse

Companies providing high-risk, high-reach services will also need to undertake regular risk assessments to identify legal but harmful material on their services. These companies will need to set clear terms and conditions which explicitly state what categories of legal but harmful material they accept (and do not accept) on their service. Companies will need to enforce these terms and conditions consistently and transparently and could face enforcement action if they do not. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework, will be ready this year.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there are new opportunities for British companies in (1) in the tourism sector, and (2) the film industry, in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

Our Departmental priority for the Kurdistan region of Iraq is to support the continuing reconstruction of its infrastructure and the protection of its cultural heritage. We work closely on this issue with the British Embassy, British Council and heritage experts from the UK and Iraq. If we are successful in protecting its cultural heritage, UK and Iraqi businesses in the tourism sector will be among the beneficiaries.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the statements by Professor David Miller about Jewish students; and what discussions they have had with (1) the University of Bristol, and (2) the police, about the steps being taken to ensure the safety of such students.

The government abhors antisemitism in all its forms and has for several years pushed for greater action from higher education providers in addressing it. This has included encouraging them to adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism, in order to have universal clarity of what constitutes antisemitic behaviour.

The government expects universities and other higher education providers to comply with their legal duties on discrimination and harassment, as well as their legal duties to protect free speech. Universities must balance the exercise of their legal duties, including on a case-by-case basis.

We expect higher education providers to be at the forefront of tackling antisemitism, making sure that higher education is a genuinely fulfilling and welcoming experience for everyone.

All higher education providers should discharge their responsibilities fully and have robust policies and procedures in place to comply with the law, to investigate and swiftly address hate crime, including any antisemitic incidents that are reported. We expect higher education providers to have robust policies and procedures in place to address staff disciplinary issues.

All higher education providers have procedures for handling student complaints and, if students are unhappy with their experience, they should use the processes in place to complain formally to their provider outlining their concerns. Where a student complaint cannot be resolved through the institution’s complaint processes, a student at a provider in England and Wales can ask for his or her complaint to be reviewed by an independent body, the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education. Students also can and should inform the police if they believe the law has been broken.

With regards to the case of Professor David Miller, universities are independent and autonomous organisations which are responsible for the management of their own affairs and for meeting their duties under the law. Accordingly, the government has not intervened directly in this case. It is the responsibility of the University of Bristol to determine whether or not Professor Miller’s remarks constitute lawful free speech. In doing so, the government’s view is that they may wish to consider, in particular, his remarks about current students at the University of Bristol. It is important to distinguish between lawful, if deeply offensive, views on the one hand, and unacceptable acts of abuse, intimidation, and violence on the other.

Regardless of whether or not it is found that Professor Miller’s conduct constitutes lawful free speech, the government considers that the University of Bristol could do more to make its condemnation of that conduct clear to current and future students and to show its commitment to creating a welcoming environment for Jewish students. The government considers Professor Miller’s views to be ill-founded and wholly reprehensible, and wholeheartedly rejects them.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
11th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Sutton Trust Learning in Lockdown, published on 21 January; and what plans they have to meet the Sutton Trust to discuss the report.

The data for the Sutton Trust report was collected at the start of the new term. Since then, the department has substantially increased delivery of devices to support vulnerable and disadvantaged pupils with remote learning.

The government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, over one million laptops and tablets have been delivered to schools, trusts, local authorities and further education providers, as of Monday 15 February, with over 490,000 delivered since 4 January 2021.

The Department has also partnered with the UK’s leading mobile operators to provide free data to help disadvantaged children get online as well as delivering over 60,000 4G wireless routers for pupils without connection at home and buying more for issues.

Where remote education is needed and pupils continue to experience barriers to digital remote education, we expect schools to work to overcome these barriers. This could include distributing school-owned laptops or supplementing digital provision with different forms of remote education such as printed resources or textbooks. This should be supplemented with other forms of communication to keep pupils and students on track or answer questions about work.

The Department has introduced a £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils and students. This will increase access to high-quality tuition for disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people, helping to accelerate their academic progress and tackling the attainment gap between them and their peers.

As part of the National Tutoring Programme, schools in the most disadvantaged areas are being supported to employ in-house academic mentors to provide tuition to their pupils. During this period of national restrictions, as members of school staff, we expect mentors to continue providing tuition support to pupils in line with their school's policies.

The Department has responded to a written enquiry from the Sutton Trust and do not have any current plans to meet. We have conducted surveys with schools, pupils and parents throughout the COVID-19 outbreak and have collected data on access to technology, which will be published in due course.

14th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there are new opportunities for British companies in the energy sector in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) team in Iraq continues to assess the ongoing opportunities in the energy sector in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI) and help British companies access applicable opportunities.

Companies in the Oil & Gas sectors are making particular progress in the KRI and we would recommend that any prospective market entrant should seek advice from the DIT team in the country about how to mitigate risks. Companies should also bear in mind that, as per the Prime Minister’s announcement of 12th December 2020, the Government is phasing out direct support to the fossil fuels sector as the UK transitions toward a low-carbon economy.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by Regeneris Consulting Economic Value of Mobile Batching Plant Sector and Consequences of Weight Change Policy, published in February 2015, what estimate they have made of the number of additional vehicle miles required to transport concrete since the permitted weight of volumetric concrete mixer vehicles was reduced to 32 tonnes.

Further to the response to HL13350, the permitted maximum laden weight of volumetric concrete mixers has not been reduced. A temporary arrangement to enable market adjustments to the operation of the vehicles complying in practice to the standard weights applicable to heavy goods vehicles has been put in place. The longer-term market adjustments may include the same vehicle or other vehicles types travelling for additional distances.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of fatal accidents caused by mobile concrete batching plants in each of the last five years.

No specific estimate has been made of fatal accidents caused by mobile concrete batching plants in each of the last five years.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of fatal accidents caused by 32 tonne drum ready-mix concrete vehicles in each of the last five years.

No specific estimate has been made of fatal accidents caused by 32 tonne drum ready-mix concrete vehicles in each of the last five years.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that banning 38.4 tonne and 44 tonne volumetric concrete mixer vehicles from 2028 will have on CO2 emissions.

A special dispensation was made for volumetric concrete mixers in operation or on order by the end of 2018 to allow them to operate at weights higher than the usual maxima. Articulated vehicles are allowed to operate at maximum laden weights of up to 44 tonnes, depending on their axle configurations.

No specific estimate has been made of the effect on CO2 emissions of requiring operators of volumetric concrete mixers to comply with the standard weight limits applicable to heavy goods vehicles (and other specialised vehicles). A total of 1106 volumetric concrete mixers are currently in circulation in Great Britain operating under Vehicle Special Orders permitting them to operate at higher than usual weights. The Department’s estimate is that these vehicles represent the vast majority of the type in operation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the decision to cut the permitted weight of volumetric concrete mixer vehicles from 38.4 tonnes to 32 tonnes, what assessment they have made of the number of extra vehicles that will be required to transport concrete.

The permitted maximum laden weight of volumetric concrete mixers has not been reduced. A temporary arrangement to enable market adjustments to the operation of the vehicles complying in practice to the standard weights applicable to heavy goods vehicles has been put in place. The longer-term market adjustments may include the same vehicle making more journeys or increased use of other vehicle types for concrete transport.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to consult utilities and highways representatives on the impact the loss of operators of 38.4 tonne and 44 tonne volumetric concrete mixer vehicles from 2028 wil have on emergency repairs.

There are no plans for further discussions with utilities and highways representatives about the maximum weights of volumetric concrete mixers. The Department recognises the use of the vehicles in repair operations and also higher effects on structures associated with vehicles operating on roads in excess of the standard weight limits.

Dispensations to allow extra weights for vehicles operating in 2018 were designed to allow the market to adjust to the vehicles complying, during the course of this decade, with the standard weights applicable to heavy goods vehicles. After that volumetric concrete mixer vehicles are allowed to continue to be operated at standard weights, as before the dispensations made in 2018.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate, if any, they have made of the number of volumetric concrete mixer vehicles produced in the UK in each of the past five years.

No specific estimate has been made of the number of this vehicle type produced in the UK on an annual basis in each of the past five years. A total of 1106 volumetric concrete mixers are currently in circulation in Great Britain operating under Vehicle Special Orders permitting them to operate at higher than usual weights. The Department’s estimate is that these vehicles represent the vast majority of the type in operation at that time and that the service life of the vehicles average effectively about ten to twelve years.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 31 January (HL5607), whether they collect comparative data showing the proportion of do not resuscitate notices that have been issued when a patient and their family have said they do not agree to such an order in comparison to the number of patients the hospital has admitted

The Department established a Ministerial Oversight Group to ensure consistent adherence to guidance on how Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPRs) are used. The National Health Service provides online guidance and information for the public on DNACPR decisions, including information on asking for a second opinion or a review and if there are concerns about, or disagreement with, a DNACPR form in a patient’s or family member’s medical records. The Care Quality Commission continues to ensure providers understand their responsibilities if allegations of inappropriate application of DNACPR decisions are brought to their attention, as well as raising cases with the relevant bodies including the General Medical Council as appropriate.

The Department does not record how many DNACPR decisions are in place or whether there is agreement with those decisions, nor do we collect comparative data showing the proportion of DNACPR decisions in comparison to hospital admissions.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 31 January (HL5607), how many do not resuscitate notices proposed by clinicians have not been subsequently imposed as a result of consulting a patient or their family who said they do not agree to such an order.

The Department established a Ministerial Oversight Group to ensure consistent adherence to guidance on how Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPRs) are used. The National Health Service provides online guidance and information for the public on DNACPR decisions, including information on asking for a second opinion or a review and if there are concerns about, or disagreement with, a DNACPR form in a patient’s or family member’s medical records. The Care Quality Commission continues to ensure providers understand their responsibilities if allegations of inappropriate application of DNACPR decisions are brought to their attention, as well as raising cases with the relevant bodies including the General Medical Council as appropriate.

The Department does not record how many DNACPR decisions are in place or whether there is agreement with those decisions, nor do we collect comparative data showing the proportion of DNACPR decisions in comparison to hospital admissions.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 31 January (HL5607), how many do not resuscitate notices have been issued at each hospital when a patient and their family have said they do not agree to such an order

The Department established a Ministerial Oversight Group to ensure consistent adherence to guidance on how Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPRs) are used. The National Health Service provides online guidance and information for the public on DNACPR decisions, including information on asking for a second opinion or a review and if there are concerns about, or disagreement with, a DNACPR form in a patient’s or family member’s medical records. The Care Quality Commission continues to ensure providers understand their responsibilities if allegations of inappropriate application of DNACPR decisions are brought to their attention, as well as raising cases with the relevant bodies including the General Medical Council as appropriate.

The Department does not record how many DNACPR decisions are in place or whether there is agreement with those decisions, nor do we collect comparative data showing the proportion of DNACPR decisions in comparison to hospital admissions.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 31 January (HL5607), how many do not resuscitate notices have been issued when a patient and their family have said they do not agree to such an order.

The Department established a Ministerial Oversight Group to ensure consistent adherence to guidance on how Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPRs) are used. The National Health Service provides online guidance and information for the public on DNACPR decisions, including information on asking for a second opinion or a review and if there are concerns about, or disagreement with, a DNACPR form in a patient’s or family member’s medical records. The Care Quality Commission continues to ensure providers understand their responsibilities if allegations of inappropriate application of DNACPR decisions are brought to their attention, as well as raising cases with the relevant bodies including the General Medical Council as appropriate.

The Department does not record how many DNACPR decisions are in place or whether there is agreement with those decisions, nor do we collect comparative data showing the proportion of DNACPR decisions in comparison to hospital admissions.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Kamall on 31 January (HL5607), what measures are in place to ensure patients and their families are informed of their right to ask for a second opinion and a review of decisions to impose do not resuscitate notices with which they do not agree

The Department established a Ministerial Oversight Group to ensure consistent adherence to guidance on how Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPRs) are used. The National Health Service provides online guidance and information for the public on DNACPR decisions, including information on asking for a second opinion or a review and if there are concerns about, or disagreement with, a DNACPR form in a patient’s or family member’s medical records. The Care Quality Commission continues to ensure providers understand their responsibilities if allegations of inappropriate application of DNACPR decisions are brought to their attention, as well as raising cases with the relevant bodies including the General Medical Council as appropriate.

The Department does not record how many DNACPR decisions are in place or whether there is agreement with those decisions, nor do we collect comparative data showing the proportion of DNACPR decisions in comparison to hospital admissions.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) doctors, or (2) other hospital staff, are able to impose a do not resuscitate notice when a patient and their family have said they do not agree to such an order.

A patient or their family or advocate should be consulted before a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) form is completed for them. The patient’s wishes and preferences should be considered but a doctor or senior responsible clinician does not need the consent of the patient or their family to complete a form if they think CPR is not in the patient’s best interests. CPR is a medical treatment and clinicians do not have to provide a treatment if they think it will be unsuccessful or would cause greater harm, even if the patient or their family do not agree with the decision.

The patient and their family should always be given the chance to understand what a DNACPR is, how the decision is made and why the doctor or medical staff in charge think CPR would not be a suitable treatment in their circumstance. If the patient, their family or advocate disagree with a DNACPR decision they can ask for a second opinion and a review.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) doctors, or (2) other medical staff, are able to impose a do not resuscitate notice without the consent of (1) a patient, or (2) the patient's family.

A patient or their family or advocate should be consulted before a Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) form is completed for them. The patient’s wishes and preferences should be considered but a doctor or senior responsible clinician does not need the consent of the patient or their family to complete a form if they think CPR is not in the patient’s best interests. CPR is a medical treatment and clinicians do not have to provide a treatment if they think it will be unsuccessful or would cause greater harm, even if the patient or their family do not agree with the decision.

The patient and their family should always be given the chance to understand what a DNACPR is, how the decision is made and why the doctor or medical staff in charge think CPR would not be a suitable treatment in their circumstance. If the patient, their family or advocate disagree with a DNACPR decision they can ask for a second opinion and a review.

Lord Kamall
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of NICE draft guidance on using Sapropterin for treating phenylketonuria, published on 25 February; and what plans they have to meet with the authors of that guidance.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is an independent body and is responsible for assessing new medicines and treatments in accordance with its existing methods and processes. It would not be appropriate for Ministers to intervene in the development of their recommendations.

24th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) possibility, and (2) impact, of sanctions on Iran being lifted as part of a renegotiated Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA); and what discussions they have held with the government of the United States in relation to this.

We are at the end of talks to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA). The deal on the table is a result of intensive negotiations and is based on input from all JCPoA participants, and the United States. The US has offered to lift JCPoA-related sanctions which would benefit the Iranian people. In exchange, Iran would reverse its nuclear escalation, return its nuclear programme to strict JCPoA limits and restore extensive monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the approach of the government of the United States to the negotiations on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, following confirmation of the departure of three members of the United States negotiating team on 24 January.

We have reached the end of talks in Vienna to restore the JCPoA. The deal on the table is a result of intensive negotiations and is based on input from all JCPoA participants, and the United States. The US has offered to lift JCPoA-related sanctions which would benefit the Iranian people. In exchange, Iran would reverse its nuclear escalation, return its nuclear programme to strict JCPoA limits and restore extensive monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

We urge all parties to focus on rapidly concluding the deal and implementing it in full.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) possibility, and (2) impact, of the government of the United States lifting sanctions on the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as part of agreement with the government of Iran on a revised Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action; and what discussions they have held with the government of the United States on this matter.

We are at the end of talks to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA). The deal on the table is a result of intensive negotiations and is based on input from all JCPoA participants and the United States. The US has offered to lift JCPoA-related sanctions iin exchange for Iran returning to full compliance with its nuclear commitments. In exchange, Iran would reverse its nuclear escalation, return its nuclear programme to strict JCPoA limits and restore extensive monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) possibility, and (2) impact, of the government of the United States lifting sanctions on the Iranian charitable foundation Bonyad Mostazafan as part of agreement with the government of Iran on a revised Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action; and what discussions they have held with the government of the United States on this matter.

We are at the end of talks to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA). The deal on the table is a result of intensive negotiations and is based on input from all JCPoA participants and the United States. The US has offered to lift JCPoA-related sanctions iin exchange for Iran returning to full compliance with its nuclear commitments. In exchange, Iran would reverse its nuclear escalation, return its nuclear programme to strict JCPoA limits and restore extensive monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the (1) possibility, and (2) impact, of the government of the United States lifting sanctions that had been imposed by US Executive Order 13876 on (a) Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, (b) President Ebrahim Raisi, (c) Vice President Mohsen Rezaei, (d) Hossein Dehghan, and (e) other Iranians associated with the Supreme Leader and accused of acts of terrorism, as part of agreement with the government of Iran on a revised Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action; and what discussions they have held with the government of the United States on this matter.

We are at the end of talks to restore the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA). The deal on the table is a result of intensive negotiations and is based on input from all JCPoA participants and the United States. The US has offered to lift JCPoA-related sanctions iin exchange for Iran returning to full compliance with its nuclear commitments. In exchange, Iran would reverse its nuclear escalation, return its nuclear programme to strict JCPoA limits and restore extensive monitoring by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will make a statement on the activities of the British Council in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.

The British Council maintains an office in Erbil and all of the British Council's cultural relations activities in Iraq extend to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). This includes programmes in arts and culture, education and English. The British Council runs a free digital library service across Iraq, including KRI, and paid education services in online English teaching and face-to-face English language assessment at centres in Erbil and Sulaymaniyah.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure their support for the Universal Rights Group non-governmental organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland is contingent on that organisation's support for the UK’s policy priorities in the Middle East region; and in particular, the UK's priorities in respect of the conflict between Israel and Palestine.

HM Government respects the independence of civil society organisations. While HMG ensures objectives of projects it funds are clear and value for money, it is not contingent on support for other UK policy priorities.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what partnerships their diplomatic missions (1) have at present, or (2) have had in the past, with the Universal Rights Group non-governmental organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland.

The United Kingdom Mission in Geneva regularly engages with a wide range of civil society organisations, including the Universal Rights Group, to help advance its work at the UN Human Rights Council. The UK Mission participates in the annual human rights "Glion Dialogue" which is hosted by the Swiss Government in partnership with the Universal Rights Group and attended by a diverse group of states and civil society organisations.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what projects their diplomatic missions have funded for the Universal Rights Group non-governmental organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland; and how much funding has been approved.

HM Government have provided funding to the Universal Rights Group for a number of projects:

  • In 2013-14 we funded URG £60,000 to support the implementation of Human Rights Council resolution 16/18 on combating religious intolerance.
  • In 2016-17, £30,250 and in 2017-18 £22,100, to support projects on corruption and SDG16 on "Leveraging the UN human rights system to contribute to the global fight against corruption and the realisation of Sustainable Development Goal 16"
  • In 2018-19 25,043 CHF for a project to support a more diverse membership of the Human Rights Council , through engagement with small island developing states and least developed countries

No funding has been provided to Universal Rights Group in the last 2 years.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of who is responsible for the rocket attacks in Erbil on 15 February.

The Government of Iraq (GoI) and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) are urgently investigating circumstances around the rocket attacks in the vicinity of Erbil Airport on 15 February. Although publicly claimed by a militia group called Awliya al-Dam (Guardians of the Blood), investigations are still ongoing. The UK has committed along with the US, France, Germany, and Italy to support the GoI's and KRG's efforts, with a view to holding accountable those responsible.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to proscribe Hamas's political wing as a terrorist group following the UK's withdrawal from EU.

The Government does not routinely comment on whether groups are, or are not, being considered for proscription. The Government keeps the list of proscribed organisations under review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the adequacy of the (1) investigation, and (2) prosecution, of online racist abuse by the (a) police, and  (b) Crown Prosecution Service.

We have robust legislation in place to deal with internet trolls, cyber-stalking and harassment, and perpetrators of grossly offensive, obscene, or menacing behaviour.

We have published the Full Government Response to the Online Harms White Paper, which includes specific measures to work with private companies and ensure that they are held to account for tackling illegal activity and content, such as hate crime, harassment, and cyber-stalking, as well as activity and content which may not be illegal but is nonetheless highly damaging to individuals (legal but harmful). The Full Government Response will be followed by legislation, which we are working on at pace, and will be ready this year.

The Home Office also funds a Police Online Hate Crime Hub to improve the police response to victims of online hate crime.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)